Urodela

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Related to urodele: Urodele amphibians

Urodela

the amphibian order containing newts and salamanders. They usually have a well-developed tail and four limbs, and have a larva with external gills.
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Full-limb regeneration in adult urodele amphibians occurs in several overlapping stages including wound healing, dedifferentiation, and redevelopment, which is similar to natural embryonic limb development [20].
Board 12 THE EVOLUTIONARY IMPLICATIONS OF CAPILLARY AND ERYTHROCYTE SIZE IN URODELE AMPHIBIANS.
By contrast, in another urodele, Ambystoma mexicanum (Orska and Imiolek 1962), and in a garter snake, Thamnophis elegans (Fox et al.
Though investigators have amassed a wealth of knowledge about these common laboratory animals and have many ways to study and manipulate them genetically, the adults of these species don't come close to matching a urodele's regenerative powers.
Among vertebrates, while most adults heal only through scarring, teleost fish and urodele amphibians can regenerate tissues, body parts, or organs after injury (Tanaka and Reddien, 2011; Seifert et al., 2012; Jazwihska and Sallin, 2016).
In addition, molecular biological studies of urodele and caecilian AQPs, coupled with physiological and histological analyses, would give significant insights into the early evolution of the genes and functions of AQP2, AQP5, and AQP6.
The limb morphology of urodele amphibians has emerged as a promising system for analysis of the action of internal constraints on morphological diversity (Alberch 1983; Alberch and Gale 1985; Hanken 1983, 1985; Hanken and Dinsmore 1986; Shubin and Alberch 1986; Oster et al.
Histological studies have suggested that the process is similar to that of the epimorphic regeneration in urodele limbs.
For instance, the tissues involved in lens and limb regeneration in urodele amphibians are particularly unlikely (in comparison to non-regenerating parts of the body) to form cancerous abnormalities even when the regrowing structures are treated with chemical carcinogens (Oviedo and Beane, 2009).
Multiple ligands that control sperm activity are also found in urodele amphibians and the Pacific herring (Cherr et al, 2008; Watanabe et al, 2010).
Molgulidae is an interesting group for research on the evolution of body plans because it contains species that have urodele, tailed, chordate larvae with notochord and muscle as well as closely related species with anural, tailless larvae that completely lack larval structures, including the sensory otolith and muscle and notochord in the tail (5).
Molecular cytogenetics of the ribosomal (18 + 28S and 5S) DNA loci in primitive and advanced urodele amphibians.