urobilinogen


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urobilinogen

 [u″ro-bi-lin´o-jen]
a colorless compound formed in the intestines by the reduction of bilirubin; the urobilinogen in the urine normally represents about 1 per cent of the bilirubin produced in the body by the breakdown of hemoglobin. Increased amounts in the urine indicate excessive bilirubin in the blood. Determination of the amount of urobilinogen excreted in a given period makes it possible to evaluate certain types of hemolytic anemia and also is of help in diagnosing liver dysfunction.



Laboratory tests for urobilinogen require collection of urine for a 24-hour period or for a 2-hour period. The 2-hour afternoon collection of urine is most commonly used because it is more convenient and also because it has been found that the excretion of urobilinogen reaches its maximum in the period from midafternoon to late evening. There is no special preparation of the patient for these tests. The exact time period in which the urine has been collected must be noted. The specimen should be taken to the laboratory immediately, since bacteria that may be present in the urine can oxidize urobilinogen and change it to urobilin.

u·ro·bi·lin·o·gen

(yūr'ō-bī-lin'ō-jen),
Precursor of urobilin.

u·ro·bi·lin·o·gen

(yūr'ō-bi-lin'ō-jen)
Precursor of urobilin.

urobilinogen

A pigment formed from BILIRUBIN in the intestine by bacterial action that is absorbed into the bloodstream and excreted in the urine. Excess is found in the urine in HAEMOLYTIC ANAEMIA and certain liver disorders. None is found in complete obstruction to the the outflow of bile from the liver.
References in periodicals archive ?
Bilirubinuria was related to proteins (OR 4.2; CI 2.8-6.4; P < 0.001) and urobilinogen (OR 4.7; CI 3.0-7.5; P < 0.001).
Increased reabsorption of bilirubin from the gut, due to lack of conversion to urobilinogen by gut bacteria.
This study has documented significantly higher urinary bilirubin and urobilinogen in malarial patients in comparison to healthy controls.
Urobilinogen (URO) is a breakdown product of bilirubin.
Urine and PCR Laboratory Results Analyte (1) Adm Day 1 Day 2 Day 3 (2) Ref Range Urine: Urine RBC 2 1 0 0 0-5/hpf Urine Leukocyte Neg Neg Neg Neg Neg 0.1-1.0 Urobilinogen 2.2 2.0 1.3 0.8 E.U./dL Urine Bilirubin Neg Neg Neg Neg Neg Specific Gravity 1.030 1.026 1.010 1.009 1.005-1.030 pH 7.10 7.13 7.25 7.26 5.0-8.0 Glucose Neg Neg Neg Neg Neg Protein + 2 +2 Neg Neg Neg Ketones Trace Neg Neg Neg Neg Microalbumin Present Present Neg Neg Neg PCR: Mutations V726A (1) Adm = Admission, (2) Ref = Reference Table 3.
Test strips for visual analysis of urine and on a closed type device "urisis" at least 10 parameters: - relative density, - acidity (ph), - leukocytes, - nitrites, - protein, - glucose, - ketone bodies, - urobilinogen, - bilirubin, - blood.
Urine routine revealed traces of albumin, absent urine sugar, bile salts and pigments and normal urobilinogen and microscopy.
The variables measured using urinalysis reagent strips included pH, protein, glucose, bilirubin, specific gravity, blood, ketones, urobilinogen, LE (as an indicator of pyuria), and NT (as an indicator of bacteriuria).
Erythrocyte concentration was 364.5 [+ or -] 26.5/[micro]l, protein (600 [+ or -] 138.2 mg/dl), urobilinogen (5.80 [+ or -] 0.39 mg/dl), Sp.
Analysis included the volume, specific gravity (SG), pH, protein, ketone body (KET) level, any occult blood (BLO), glucose, and bilirubin (BIL), nitrite (NIT), and urobilinogen (URO) levels, and sediment.
A portion of bilirubin is converted to urobilinogen in the intestine and eventually gets excreted into the urine and feces.
Multivariable strips (Comburl0 Test[R]; Roche Diagnostics) were used to analyze samples for specific gravity, pH, leukocytes, nitrite, protein, glucose, ketones, urobilinogen, bil irubin, and blood, and a Hitachi 917 analyzer (Roche Diagnostics) was used for assays of electrolytes, total protein, creatinine (enzymatic test), and urea (for results, see Table 1 in the Data Supplement that accompanies the online version of this article at http://www.clinchem.