urobilinogen


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urobilinogen

 [u″ro-bi-lin´o-jen]
a colorless compound formed in the intestines by the reduction of bilirubin; the urobilinogen in the urine normally represents about 1 per cent of the bilirubin produced in the body by the breakdown of hemoglobin. Increased amounts in the urine indicate excessive bilirubin in the blood. Determination of the amount of urobilinogen excreted in a given period makes it possible to evaluate certain types of hemolytic anemia and also is of help in diagnosing liver dysfunction.



Laboratory tests for urobilinogen require collection of urine for a 24-hour period or for a 2-hour period. The 2-hour afternoon collection of urine is most commonly used because it is more convenient and also because it has been found that the excretion of urobilinogen reaches its maximum in the period from midafternoon to late evening. There is no special preparation of the patient for these tests. The exact time period in which the urine has been collected must be noted. The specimen should be taken to the laboratory immediately, since bacteria that may be present in the urine can oxidize urobilinogen and change it to urobilin.

u·ro·bi·lin·o·gen

(yūr'ō-bī-lin'ō-jen),
Precursor of urobilin.

urobilinogen

/uro·bi·lino·gen/ (-bi-lin´o-jen) a colorless compound formed in the intestines by reduction of bilirubin.

urobilinogen

[yoo͡r′əbīlin′əjən]
a colorless compound formed in the intestine after the breakdown of bilirubin by bacteria. Some of this substance is excreted in feces, and some is resorbed and excreted again in bile or urine. See also urobilin.

u·ro·bi·lin·o·gen

(yūr'ō-bi-lin'ō-jen)
Precursor of urobilin.

urobilinogen

A pigment formed from BILIRUBIN in the intestine by bacterial action that is absorbed into the bloodstream and excreted in the urine. Excess is found in the urine in HAEMOLYTIC ANAEMIA and certain liver disorders. None is found in complete obstruction to the the outflow of bile from the liver.

urobilinogen

a colorless compound formed in the intestines by the reduction of bilirubin. Small amounts of the bilirubin produced in the body by the breakdown of hemoglobin are excreted in the urine as urobilinogen. Increased amounts of urobilinogen in the urine indicate an excessive amount of bilirubin in the blood. Determination of the amount of urobilinogen excreted in a given period makes it possible to evaluate certain types of hemolytic anemia and also is of help in diagnosing liver dysfunction such as hepatocellular damage.

fecal urobilinogen
a group of urobilinoid substances which react with Ehrlich's reagent. Presence indicates an open bile duct and a functional enterohepatic circulation of bile pigments.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the present study, significantly high incidence of urinary bilirubin and urobilinogen in malarial subjects in comparison to controls suggests either hepatic involvement or haemolysis.
Interferences for urobilinogen include formalin, high concentrations of nitrites, and drugs or substances that color the urine.
Several other measured variables, including microscopic elements, pH, protein, glucose, bilirubin, specific gravity, blood, ketones, and urobilinogen, showed no correlation to culture positive urine samples.
A portion of bilirubin is converted to urobilinogen in the intestine and eventually gets excreted into the urine and feces.
Multivariable strips (Comburl0 Test[R]; Roche Diagnostics) were used to analyze samples for specific gravity, pH, leukocytes, nitrite, protein, glucose, ketones, urobilinogen, bil irubin, and blood, and a Hitachi 917 analyzer (Roche Diagnostics) was used for assays of electrolytes, total protein, creatinine (enzymatic test), and urea (for results, see Table 1 in the Data Supplement that accompanies the online version of this article at http://www.
0 g/dl); lactate dehydrogenase, 380 U/L (normal range: 80-230 U/L); total cholesterol, 284 mg/dl (normal range: 140-200 mg/dl), Triglycerides, 299 mg/dl (normal range: 40-160 mg/dl), HDLC, 34 mg/dl (normal range: 35-80 mg/dl), LDL-C, 189 mg/dl (normal value: <130 mg/dl); bilirubin and urobilinogen in the urine.
Ehrlich also founded the technique of methylene blue vital staining and established a test for urobilinogen.
Although both direct and indirect Coombs' tests were positive, there was no evidence of hemolysis since the serum bilirubin level, urine urobilinogen concentration and red cell fragility were all normal.
the urine was tested for the following: leukocytes, nitrite, urobilinogen, protein, pH, blood, specific gravity, ketone, bilirubin, glucose, and color.
The examination of urine included color, appearance, pH, specific gravity, urea nitrogen, urobilinogen, bilirubin, ketone bodies, nitrites, qualitative protein and glucose measurements, leukocyte esterase, and occult blood.
013; protein, 100 mg/dL; bilirubin, small; blood, large; urobilinogen, 1.