urinometer


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urinometer

 [u″rĭ-nom´ĕ-ter]
an instrument for determining the specific gravity of urine.
Urinometer. From Lammon et al., 1995.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

u·ri·nom·e·ter

(yūr'i-nom'ĕ-tĕr),
A hydrometer for determining the specific gravity of urine.
Synonym(s): urogravimeter, urometer
[urine + G. metron, measure]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

urinometer

(yo͝or′ə-nŏm′ĭ-tər)
n.
A hydrometer for measuring the specific gravity of urine.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

u·ri·nom·e·ter

(yūr'i-nom'ĕ-tĕr)
Instrument used to measure specific gravity in urine, now largely replaced by the dipstick method.
See also: specific gravity
Synonym(s): urogravimeter, urometer.
[urine + G. metron, measure]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
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References in periodicals archive ?
Sarubbi Jr., "Serratia marcescens nosocomial infections of the urinary tract associated with urine measuring containers and urinometers," The American Journal of Medicine, vol.
Serratia marcescens nosocomial infection of the urinary tract associated with urine measuring containers and urinometers. Am J Med 1981;70: 659-63.
Dipstick specific gravity readings may be elevated in the presence of moderate to increased amounts of protein or ketones.[3,4] Urines with specific gravity [is greater than]1.025 cannot be measured reliably with current ionic concentration methodology and should be tested with a refractometer or urinometer.[3] When you need highly accurate specific gravity measurements, however, use osmolality determinations.[4]
Reflecting his apparent interest in new technology, he was later responsible for placing an ambitious order for four stethoscopes, four cases of dissecting instruments, four barometers, four atmospheric thermometers, four register thermometers, three rotatory electro-magnetic machines, four urinometers, six pluviometers, one case of acupuncture needles, and three microscopes of "good power for pathological purposes for Quebec, Montreal, & Kingston." (52) To place this order the doctor used a standard issue form printed in the 1840s, but only the category of stethoscope was considered routine enough to have been pre-printed; the other more original requests had to be added to the list in handwriting.