urinoma

urinoma

 [u″rĭ-no´mah]
a collection of urine encapsulated by fibrous tissue, resulting from leakage of urine from a tear in the ureter, renal pelvis, or renal calices because of obstruction of the ureter or trauma.

u·ri·no·ma

(yūr'i-nō'mă),
A collection of extravasated urine.
Synonym(s): urinary cyst

urinoma

Pediatric urology A tumor-like urine-filled cyst seen in the renal capsule of children, which is 2º to congenital urethral obstruction, in which urine extravasates into subcapsular or perirenal spaces via ruptured calyceal fornices.

u·ri·no·ma

(yūr'i-nō'mă)
A cystic collection of extravasated urine.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the vast majority of cases drainage of the urinoma is sufficient to allow healing of the collecting system defect.
Distribution of Patients According to Post Operative Complications Group 1 Group 2 (URS) (Open Ureterolithotomy Gross 0 1 Hematuria Uretic 0 1 colic Residual 0 -- stone fragments Urinoma 0 0 Post-op 0 0 Urine Leak Wound 1 -- infection Note: Table made from bar graph.
Intraperitoneal bladder perforation after TURBT is a dreaded complication that may lead to various sequels such as hemorrhage, peritonitis, urinoma, infection tumor spillage, TUR syndrome and even death.
Perinephric fluid collections include hematoma, seroma, lymphocele, urinoma, and abscesses.
These include unilateral VUR with renal dysplasia, and the presence of urachus, ascites, urinoma and bladder diverticula.
The urinary system obstruction is followed by an increase of intraluminal pressure, which can cause rupture of the urinary tract, urinary extravasation and development of urinoma. A urinoma is a localized collection of urine in the retroperitoneum, outside of the urinary tract that occurs after an injury of the urinary system wall [2].
If there is a ureteral defect, the patient may note profuse wound leakage, increased abdominal fluid, or a urinoma, ileus, fever, peritonitis, or hematuria.
Bilateral perirenal urinoma with mediastinal extension.
While, in the ED, urology was consulted and requested interventional radiology to drain the urinoma and to place a Foley catheter to monitor urine output, the attending physician, at the request of interventional radiology, performed a needle aspiration of the loculated fluid collection in the right flank via ultrasound and noted a small amount of purulent and urine-like fluid from two separate areas of collection.
The etiology was believed to be an infected urinoma caused by instrumentation during stent placement and she was treated with ceftriaxone and metronidazole.
A Foley catheter remained in the bladder and a drainage tube in the abdomen to prevent possible urinoma formation and to control bleeding.
This constellation is an important clue to suspect a urinoma, i.e., extravasation of urine.