lithiasis

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Related to urinary lithiasis: renal calculus

lithiasis

 [lĭ-thi´ah-sis]
1. a condition marked by formation of calculi and concretions.
2. sometimes used as a synonym for one of the specific types of lithiasis, such as urolithiasis, nephrolithiasis, or cholelithiasis.
gallbladder lithiasis cholecystolithiasis.
pancreatic lithiasis pancreatolithiasis.
renal lithiasis nephrolithiasis.
urinary lithiasis urolithiasis.

li·thi·a·sis

(li-thī'ă-sis),
Formation of calculi of any kind, especially of biliary or urinary calculi.
[litho- + G. -iasis, condition]

lithiasis

/li·thi·a·sis/ (lĭ-thi´ah-sis) the formation or presence of calculi or other concretions.

lithiasis

(lĭ-thī′ə-sĭs)
n. pl. lithia·ses (-sēz′)
Pathological formation of mineral concretions in the body.

lithiasis

[lithī′əsis]
Etymology: Gk, lithos, stone, osis, condition
the formation of calculi in the hollow organs or ducts of the body. Calculi are formed of mineral salts and may irritate, inflame, or obstruct the organ in which they form or lodge. Lithiasis occurs most commonly in the gallbladder, kidney, and lower urinary tract. Lithiasis may be asymptomatic, but more often the condition is extremely painful. Surgery may be necessary if the stones cannot be excreted spontaneously. Lower urinary tract calculi often can be dissolved. See also biliary calculus, cholelithiasis, renal calculus, urinary calculus.

li·thi·a·sis

(li-thī'ă-sis)
Formation of calculi of any kind, especially of biliary or urinary calculi.
[litho- + G. -iasis, condition]

lithiasis

The formation of stones (calculi) anywhere in the body, but especially in the urinary and bile secretion and storage systems.

lithiasis

a condition marked by formation of calculi and concretions. See gallstone, salivary calculus, urolithiasis, urolith, prostatic calculus.
References in periodicals archive ?
Evaluating the prevalence of urinary lithiasis among civil construction workers, as well as identifying possible risk factors involved in the aetiology of the referred illness, providing data for the formulation of preventive campaigns specifically directed toward this category of professionals.
Therefore, it becomes strongly evident the influence of elevated body mass index in the also considerably high prevalence of urinary lithiasis identified in the population of this study.
In the Urology Department, abdominal radiographs (two sided) and kidney, ureter, bladder (KUB) urinary ultrasonographic evaluations were obtained for all patients to diagnose urinary lithiasis.
Effects of extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy treatment on transient evoked otoacoustic emissions in patients with urinary lithiasis.