urinary calculus


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calculus

 [kal´ku-lus] (pl. cal´culi) (L.)
an abnormal concretion, usually composed of mineral salts, occurring within the body, chiefly in hollow organs or their passages. Called also stone. See also kidney stone and gallstone. adj., adj cal´culous.
biliary calculus gallstone.
bladder calculus vesical calculus.
bronchial calculus broncholith.
calcium oxalate calculus oxalate calculus.
dental calculus a hard, stonelike concretion, varying in color from creamy yellow to black, that forms on the teeth or dental prostheses through calcification of dental plaque; it begins as a yellowish film formed of calcium phosphate and carbonate, food particles, and other organic matter that is deposited on the teeth by the saliva. It should be removed regularly by a dentist or dental hygienist; if neglected, it can cause bacteria to lodge between the gums and the teeth, causing gum infection, dental caries, loosening of the teeth, and other disorders. Called also tartar.
gastric calculus gastrolith.
intestinal calculus enterolith.
lung calculus a hard mass or concretion formed in the bronchi around a small center of inorganic material, or from calcified portions of lung tissue or adjacent lymph nodes. Called also pneumolith.
mammary calculus a concretion in one of the lactiferous ducts.
nasal calculus rhinolith.
oxalate calculus a hard urinary calculus of calcium oxalate; some are covered with minute sharp spines that may abrade the renal pelvic epithelium, and others are smooth. Called also calcium oxalate calculus.
phosphate calculus a urinary calculus composed of a phosphate along with calcium oxalate and ammonium urate; it may be hard, soft, or friable, and so large that it may fill the renal pelvis and calices.
prostatic calculus a concretion formed in the prostate, chiefly of calcium carbonate and phosphate. Called also prostatolith.
renal calculus kidney stone.
staghorn calculus a urinary calculus, usually a phosphate calculus, found in the renal pelvis and shaped like the antlers of a stag because it extends into multiple calices.
urate calculus uric acid calculus.
urethral calculus a urinary calculus in the urethra; symptoms vary according to the patient's sex and the site of lodgment.
uric acid calculus a hard, yellow or reddish-yellow urinary calculus formed from uric acid.
urinary calculus a calculus in any part of the urinary tract; it is vesical when lodged in the bladder and renal (see kidney stone) when in the renal pelvis. Common types named for their primary components are oxalate calculi, phosphate calculi, and uric acid calculi. Called also urolith.
uterine calculus any kind of concretion in the uterus, such as a calcified myoma. Called also hysterolith and uterolith.
vesical calculus a urinary calculus in the urinary bladder. Called also bladder calculus.

u·ri·nar·y cal·cu·lus

a calculus in the kidney, ureter, bladder, or urethra.
Synonym(s): urolith

urinary calculus

n.
A hard mass of mineral salts in the urinary tract. Also called cystolith, urolith.

u·ri·nar·y cal·cu·lus

(yūr'i-nar-ē kal'kyū-lŭs)
A calculus in the kidney, ureter, bladder, or urethra.

urinary calculus

Any stone or concretion of mineral or organic substances that forms within the kidney or urine collecting system. Urinary stone formation is encouraged by reduced urinary output with highly concentrated urine, infection, and various metabolic conditions in which abnormal quantities of substances occur in the urine.
References in periodicals archive ?
One hundred consecutively collected urinary calculus samples from 70 males (median age, 56.5 years; range, 5-75 years) and 30 females (median age, 49 years; range, 21-74 years) served for testing the predictive performance of the new GGN method.
Pulverized urinary calculus (1.5 mg) was mixed with 180 mg of KBr with a pestle and mortar.
In a popular work entitled An Essay on The Chemical History and Medical Treatment of Calculous Disorders (1817 and 1819), he described his discovery of a new substance in a urinary calculus. He named it xanthic oxide (Greek: xanthos, yellow) because it forms a lemonyellow colored compound when treated with nitric acid.
Simple tests were given for each type of urinary calculus in terms of their chemical reactions in solution, and after incineration with the blowpipe used with a small spirit (alcohol) lamp (not a flame color test).
In the present study, the incidence of radiological confirmed cases of urinary calculus disease were 2.69% of the total hospital admissions in surgical wards.
The patient of urinary calculus usually receive various treatment of different and usually report late when stone becomes large and causes severe symptom due to obstruction.
Geographical and nutritional aspects of endemic stones, in urinary calculus international urinary stone conference.
At present there are many treatment modalities available in the armamentarium of the surgeon for the treatment of urinary calculus. Most ureteral stones can be observed with a reasonable expectation of uneventful stone passage and this strategy is generally less costly and less invasive than any other option, if successful.