urinary calculus


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calculus

 [kal´ku-lus] (pl. cal´culi) (L.)
an abnormal concretion, usually composed of mineral salts, occurring within the body, chiefly in hollow organs or their passages. Called also stone. See also kidney stone and gallstone. adj., adj cal´culous.
biliary calculus gallstone.
bladder calculus vesical calculus.
bronchial calculus broncholith.
calcium oxalate calculus oxalate calculus.
dental calculus a hard, stonelike concretion, varying in color from creamy yellow to black, that forms on the teeth or dental prostheses through calcification of dental plaque; it begins as a yellowish film formed of calcium phosphate and carbonate, food particles, and other organic matter that is deposited on the teeth by the saliva. It should be removed regularly by a dentist or dental hygienist; if neglected, it can cause bacteria to lodge between the gums and the teeth, causing gum infection, dental caries, loosening of the teeth, and other disorders. Called also tartar.
gastric calculus gastrolith.
intestinal calculus enterolith.
lung calculus a hard mass or concretion formed in the bronchi around a small center of inorganic material, or from calcified portions of lung tissue or adjacent lymph nodes. Called also pneumolith.
mammary calculus a concretion in one of the lactiferous ducts.
nasal calculus rhinolith.
oxalate calculus a hard urinary calculus of calcium oxalate; some are covered with minute sharp spines that may abrade the renal pelvic epithelium, and others are smooth. Called also calcium oxalate calculus.
phosphate calculus a urinary calculus composed of a phosphate along with calcium oxalate and ammonium urate; it may be hard, soft, or friable, and so large that it may fill the renal pelvis and calices.
prostatic calculus a concretion formed in the prostate, chiefly of calcium carbonate and phosphate. Called also prostatolith.
renal calculus kidney stone.
staghorn calculus a urinary calculus, usually a phosphate calculus, found in the renal pelvis and shaped like the antlers of a stag because it extends into multiple calices.
urate calculus uric acid calculus.
urethral calculus a urinary calculus in the urethra; symptoms vary according to the patient's sex and the site of lodgment.
uric acid calculus a hard, yellow or reddish-yellow urinary calculus formed from uric acid.
urinary calculus a calculus in any part of the urinary tract; it is vesical when lodged in the bladder and renal (see kidney stone) when in the renal pelvis. Common types named for their primary components are oxalate calculi, phosphate calculi, and uric acid calculi. Called also urolith.
uterine calculus any kind of concretion in the uterus, such as a calcified myoma. Called also hysterolith and uterolith.
vesical calculus a urinary calculus in the urinary bladder. Called also bladder calculus.

u·ri·nar·y cal·cu·lus

a calculus in the kidney, ureter, bladder, or urethra.
Synonym(s): urolith

urinary calculus

n.
A hard mass of mineral salts in the urinary tract. Also called cystolith, urolith.

urinary calculus

a mineral concretion formed in any part of the urinary tract. Calculi may be large enough to obstruct the flow of urine or small enough to be passed with the urine. Calculi can originate in either the kidneys or the bladder. Kinds of urinary calculi are renal calculus and vesical calculus. See also calculus.

u·ri·nar·y cal·cu·lus

(yūr'i-nar-ē kal'kyū-lŭs)
A calculus in the kidney, ureter, bladder, or urethra.

urinary calculus

Any stone or concretion of mineral or organic substances that forms within the kidney or urine collecting system. Urinary stone formation is encouraged by reduced urinary output with highly concentrated urine, infection, and various metabolic conditions in which abnormal quantities of substances occur in the urine.

calculus

pl. calculi [L.] an abnormal concretion, usually composed of mineral salts, occurring within the animal body, chiefly in the hollow organs or their passages. Called also stones, as in kidney stones (urolithiasis) and gallstones. See also hippomanes.

biliary calculus
a gallstone.
bronchial calculus
see bronchial calculus.
dental calculus
mineralized deposits of calcium phosphate and carbonate, with organic matter, deposited on tooth surfaces. Found commonly in dogs and cats, sometimes in horses, rarely in sheep. May initiate caries and peridontal disease.
lung calculus
a concretion formed in the bronchi. See also bronchial calculus.
pancreatic calculus
very small (4 to 5 mm) calculi in pancreatic ducts, rare and of no pathogenic importance.
prostatic calculus
concretions of calcium phosphates and carbonates in the prostatic ducts are rare and of no clinical significance.
renal calculus
salivary calculus
white, hard, laminated concretions in the salivary duct; a sialolith. Occurs most commonly in horses.
urethral calculus
a calculus lodged in the urethra causes obstruction of the urethra with a potential for causing rupture of the bladder or perforation of the urethra and leaking of urine into subcutaneous or retroperitoneal sites. See also urolith, urolithiasis.
urinary calculus
a calculus in any part of the urinary tract. See urolithiasis.
vesical calculus
a urolith in the urinary bladder.
References in periodicals archive ?
X-ray diffraction is occasionally recommended as a reference method for urinary calculus analyses.
It is not known what analytical precision and bias are relevant in terms of the prevention of urinary calculus recurrence.
Simple tests were given for each type of urinary calculus in terms of their chemical reactions in solution, and after incineration with the blowpipe used with a small spirit (alcohol) lamp (not a flame color test).