urethral bulking agent

urethral bulking agent

Urogynecology An injectable hydrogel composed of a biocompatible recombinant protein polymer used to bulk tissue about the intrinsic sphincter to provide complete closure and urinary control for ♀ with incontinence due to intrinsic sphincter deficiency. See Urinary incontinence.
References in periodicals archive ?
In China, few patients have been treated with urethral bulking agent injections and AUS.
The Macroplastique Implants is an injectable urethral bulking agent to treat adult female stress urinary incontinence primarily due to intrinsic sphincter deficiency.
Injectable Teflon was widely used as a urethral bulking agent in the 1950s and 1960s and was effective, but it has been largely abandoned because of fear that the Teflon would migrate to other tissues, as well as other safety issues.
Use of the urethral bulking agent Tegress is strongly associated with urethral erosions and urinary fistulas.
The urethral bulking agent Uryx improved stress urinary incontinence comparably or better than Contigen 12 months after treatment in a multicenter study presented at the annual meeting of the American Urogynecologic Society.
Tissue Science Laboratories plc (LSE:TSL), the medical devices company specialising in human tissue replacement and repair, announces further positive clinical results for its porcine-derived collagen product, Permacol(R) injection, as a Urethral Bulking Agent (UBA) in the treatment of Urinary Stress Incontinence (USI).
Funds will be used to support the company's product development efforts, including preclinical development of MTI's EMBOLYX technology as a urethral bulking agent for incontinence and the initiation of human clinical studies.
Genyx Medical is currently seeking an initial round of financing to provide support for its product development efforts, through the completion of preclinical testing of EMBOLYX as a urethral bulking agent for incontinence, and initiation of human clinical trials.
2,3) SUI treatment options, beginning from least to most invasive, include pelvic floor exercises, biofeedback and/or physical therapy, continence devices, off-label use of medications, urethral bulking agents, and surgical correction with slings.
Food and Drug Administration-approved urethral bulking agents include collagen (Conti-gen), calcium hydroxylapatite (Coaptite), and carbon bead particles (Durasphere).
Targeted products include urethral bulking agents for the treatment of stress urinary incontinence, dermal augmentation products for cosmetic and reconstructive surgery, surgical adhesives and sealants, scaffolds for wound healing and tissue engineering, and depots for local drug delivery.
1) Injectable urethral bulking agents fall along this spectrum and offer a less invasive treatment option for selected women with SUI.