uremia


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uremia

 [u-re´me-ah]
1. an excess in the blood of urea, creatinine, and other nitrogenous end products of protein and amino acid metabolism; more correctly referred to as azotemia.
2. in current usage, the entire complex of signs and symptoms of chronic renal failure. As the glomerular filtration rate falls in either acute tubular necrosis or chronic renal failure, serum urea (usually expressed as blood urea nitrogen content or BUN) and creatinine rise to very high levels. However, BUN and creatinine measurements are only roughly correlated with uremic symptoms. Other nitrogenous compounds present in small amounts may produce most of the toxic effects. Some uremic symptoms are due to losses of kidney function that do not involve uremia (azotemia). adj., adj ure´mic.
Patient Care. A major activity of care is assessment of health status and learning needs on an ongoing basis throughout the course of the illness. The systemic effects of uremia involve virtually every system of the body and present problems related to dysfunction of each system. Maintaining adequate nutrition is a very real challenge for the patient with this condition. The cooperative efforts of nutritionists and other health care professionals are needed to meet the goals of minimizing uremic toxicity, maintaining acceptable electrolyte levels, controlling hypertension, providing sufficient calories, and maintaining adequate nutritional status. Because of buildup of nitrogenous wastes from protein metabolism, dietary intake of protein may be severely limited. If any protein foods are allowed they should be of high quality; for example, eggs, milk, and cheese provide all of the essential amino acids in relatively small quantities.



Potassium restriction may also be indicated because of inability of the kidney to excrete it. This complicates the problem, however, because foods rich in potassium also are high-quality protein foods. These same foods also contain phosphorus, which may be restricted. A sodium-free diet usually is prescribed, but this can pose problems in regard to food selection and patient compliance.

Patients in the terminal stage of uremia will require special mouth care; measures to prevent pressure ulcers; protection from injury due to altered levels of consciousness; monitoring and protection from deleterious effects of excessive bleeding related to lack of renal hormone erythropoietin and bone marrow depression; and interventions appropriate to psychological and emotional support for the patient and family members during a terminal illness.
Systemic effects of uremia.

u·re·mi·a

(yū-rē'mē-ă),
1. An excess of urea and other nitrogenous waste in the blood.
2. The complex of symptoms due to severe persisting renal failure that can be relieved by dialysis.
[G. ouron, urine, + haima, blood]

uremia

/ure·mia/ (u-re´me-ah)
1. azotemia; an excess of the nitrogenous end products of protein and amino acid metabolism in the blood.
2. the entire constellation of signs and symptoms of chronic renal failure.ure´mic

uremia

also

uraemia

(yo͝o-rē′mē-ə)
n.
A toxic condition resulting from kidney disease in which there is retention in the bloodstream of waste products normally excreted in the urine. Also called azotemia.

u·re′mic adj.

uremia

[yoo͡rē′mē·ə]
Etymology: Gk, ouron + haima, blood
the presence of excessive amounts of urea and other nitrogenous waste products in the blood, as occurs in renal failure. Also called azotemia. See also chronic glomerulonephritis, subacute glomerulonephritis. uremic, adj.

uremia

Prerenal azotemia, renal underperfusion Nephrology A constellation of Sx caused by the retention of urea and other products of protein catabolism due to inadequate kidney function in advanced renal failure Clinical N&V, pruritus, uremic frost, mental clouding, peripheral neuropathies, osteodystrophy, HTN, CHF, pericarditis, pulmonary edema Lab Acidosis, anemia, azotemia, ↓ Ca2+, ↑ PO4, coagulopathy Pathogenesis 1º glomerular and/or tubular disease Management General support–restriction of protein, Na+, K+, and water; dialysis–hemodialysis, peritoneal dialysis; kidney transplant

Uremia

The presence of excessive amounts of urea and other waste products in the blood.
Mentioned in: Alport Syndrome

uremia (yōō·rēˑ·mē·),

n the presence of increased amounts of urea and other nitrogenous waste products in blood. The condition typically results from renal failure. Also called
azotemia.

u·re·mi·a

(yūr-ē'mē-ă)
1. Excess of urea and other nitrogenous waste in blood.
2. Complex of symptoms due to severe persisting renal failure that can be relieved by dialysis.
Synonym(s): uraemia.
[G. ouron, urine, + haima, blood]

uremia (ūrē´mēə),

n the presence of urinary components in the circulating blood and the resultant symptoms. Manifestations include weakness, headache, confusion, vomiting, and coma, and in terminal chronic renal disease, purpura and epistaxis may be present. Uremia is caused by insufficient urinary excretion for any reason. See also stomatitis, uremic.

uremia

1. an excess in the blood of urea, creatinine, and other nitrogenous end products of protein and amino acid metabolism; more correctly referred to as azotemia.
2. in current usage, the syndrome of chronic renal failure. As the glomerular filtration rate falls in either acute tubular necrosis or chronic renal failure, serum urea (usually expressed as blood urea nitrogen content, BUN) and creatinine rise to very high levels. However, BUN and creatinine measurements are only roughly correlated with the clinical signs of uremia. Other nitrogenous compounds present in small amounts may produce most of the toxic effects. Some uremic signs are due to losses of kidney function that do not involve azotemia.
Uremia is a syndrome that occurs as the end-stage in renal insufficiency. The pathology includes stomatitis, pneumonopathy, endocarditis and gastritis. In the dog and cat there is vomiting, diarrhea, anemia and sometimes ulcerative stomatitis. In horses there is depression and chronic diarrhea. Cattle show somnolence, depression and recumbency. Chickens develop visceral gout. Called also kidney failure.

prerenal uremia
References in periodicals archive ?
The findings of the study indicated that there is a positive significant relationship between the features of managers' entrepreneurship and their organizational performance in the non-private schools of Uremia, 2nd district.
They concluded the impaired clearance was possibly due to alterations in hepatic blood flow and enzyme activity caused by the uremia.
discuss the mechanism of the platelet defects associated with myeloproliferative diseases, uremia, and liver disease.
Uremia, ototoxins, axonal uremic neuropathy, anemia, and toxic degradation products from cellulose acetate dialyzer membranes are all possible etiologic factors.
Objective: The objective of this study was to elucidate whether and how the level of homocysteine as a cause of hemostatic abnormalities affects platelet count in hemodialysis patients with uremia.
patents for its scientifically validated, gut-based, uremia therapy products.
Furthermore, the fact that the patients were 5 years out from transplant indicates that sexual problems are not "simply a residual of pretransplant sexual deficits associated with the uremia of end-stage renal disease," they added.
Recognition of urea retention and the concept of uremia stemmed from Bright's observations.
The symptoms of uremia include nausea and vomiting, poor appetite, weight loss, fatigue, swelling (edema), difficulty sleeping, and difficulty breathing.
H7 infection occurred in persons residing in the same community: an 18-year old man who had onset of bloody diarrhea on July 18 and an 84-year old woman with diabetes mellitus and chronic uremia who developed nonbloody diarrhea after eating the hamburger.