uremia


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uremia

 [u-re´me-ah]
1. an excess in the blood of urea, creatinine, and other nitrogenous end products of protein and amino acid metabolism; more correctly referred to as azotemia.
2. in current usage, the entire complex of signs and symptoms of chronic renal failure. As the glomerular filtration rate falls in either acute tubular necrosis or chronic renal failure, serum urea (usually expressed as blood urea nitrogen content or BUN) and creatinine rise to very high levels. However, BUN and creatinine measurements are only roughly correlated with uremic symptoms. Other nitrogenous compounds present in small amounts may produce most of the toxic effects. Some uremic symptoms are due to losses of kidney function that do not involve uremia (azotemia). adj., adj ure´mic.
Patient Care. A major activity of care is assessment of health status and learning needs on an ongoing basis throughout the course of the illness. The systemic effects of uremia involve virtually every system of the body and present problems related to dysfunction of each system. Maintaining adequate nutrition is a very real challenge for the patient with this condition. The cooperative efforts of nutritionists and other health care professionals are needed to meet the goals of minimizing uremic toxicity, maintaining acceptable electrolyte levels, controlling hypertension, providing sufficient calories, and maintaining adequate nutritional status. Because of buildup of nitrogenous wastes from protein metabolism, dietary intake of protein may be severely limited. If any protein foods are allowed they should be of high quality; for example, eggs, milk, and cheese provide all of the essential amino acids in relatively small quantities.



Potassium restriction may also be indicated because of inability of the kidney to excrete it. This complicates the problem, however, because foods rich in potassium also are high-quality protein foods. These same foods also contain phosphorus, which may be restricted. A sodium-free diet usually is prescribed, but this can pose problems in regard to food selection and patient compliance.

Patients in the terminal stage of uremia will require special mouth care; measures to prevent pressure ulcers; protection from injury due to altered levels of consciousness; monitoring and protection from deleterious effects of excessive bleeding related to lack of renal hormone erythropoietin and bone marrow depression; and interventions appropriate to psychological and emotional support for the patient and family members during a terminal illness.
Systemic effects of uremia.

u·re·mi·a

(yū-rē'mē-ă),
1. An excess of urea and other nitrogenous waste in the blood.
2. The complex of symptoms due to severe persisting renal failure that can be relieved by dialysis.
[G. ouron, urine, + haima, blood]

uremia

/ure·mia/ (u-re´me-ah)
1. azotemia; an excess of the nitrogenous end products of protein and amino acid metabolism in the blood.
2. the entire constellation of signs and symptoms of chronic renal failure.ure´mic

uremia

also

uraemia

(yo͝o-rē′mē-ə)
n.
A toxic condition resulting from kidney disease in which there is retention in the bloodstream of waste products normally excreted in the urine. Also called azotemia.

u·re′mic adj.

uremia

[yoo͡rē′mē·ə]
Etymology: Gk, ouron + haima, blood
the presence of excessive amounts of urea and other nitrogenous waste products in the blood, as occurs in renal failure. Also called azotemia. See also chronic glomerulonephritis, subacute glomerulonephritis. uremic, adj.

uremia

Prerenal azotemia, renal underperfusion Nephrology A constellation of Sx caused by the retention of urea and other products of protein catabolism due to inadequate kidney function in advanced renal failure Clinical N&V, pruritus, uremic frost, mental clouding, peripheral neuropathies, osteodystrophy, HTN, CHF, pericarditis, pulmonary edema Lab Acidosis, anemia, azotemia, ↓ Ca2+, ↑ PO4, coagulopathy Pathogenesis 1º glomerular and/or tubular disease Management General support–restriction of protein, Na+, K+, and water; dialysis–hemodialysis, peritoneal dialysis; kidney transplant

Uremia

The presence of excessive amounts of urea and other waste products in the blood.
Mentioned in: Alport Syndrome

uremia (yōō·rēˑ·mē·),

n the presence of increased amounts of urea and other nitrogenous waste products in blood. The condition typically results from renal failure. Also called
azotemia.

u·re·mi·a

(yūr-ē'mē-ă)
1. Excess of urea and other nitrogenous waste in blood.
2. Complex of symptoms due to severe persisting renal failure that can be relieved by dialysis.
Synonym(s): uraemia.
[G. ouron, urine, + haima, blood]

uremia (ūrē´mēə),

n the presence of urinary components in the circulating blood and the resultant symptoms. Manifestations include weakness, headache, confusion, vomiting, and coma, and in terminal chronic renal disease, purpura and epistaxis may be present. Uremia is caused by insufficient urinary excretion for any reason. See also stomatitis, uremic.

uremia

1. an excess in the blood of urea, creatinine, and other nitrogenous end products of protein and amino acid metabolism; more correctly referred to as azotemia.
2. in current usage, the syndrome of chronic renal failure. As the glomerular filtration rate falls in either acute tubular necrosis or chronic renal failure, serum urea (usually expressed as blood urea nitrogen content, BUN) and creatinine rise to very high levels. However, BUN and creatinine measurements are only roughly correlated with the clinical signs of uremia. Other nitrogenous compounds present in small amounts may produce most of the toxic effects. Some uremic signs are due to losses of kidney function that do not involve azotemia.
Uremia is a syndrome that occurs as the end-stage in renal insufficiency. The pathology includes stomatitis, pneumonopathy, endocarditis and gastritis. In the dog and cat there is vomiting, diarrhea, anemia and sometimes ulcerative stomatitis. In horses there is depression and chronic diarrhea. Cattle show somnolence, depression and recumbency. Chickens develop visceral gout. Called also kidney failure.

prerenal uremia
References in periodicals archive ?
Our conclusions are not in agreement with the data reported by Ikeda's group, which concluded that IS is the major serum binding inhibitor of furosemide in uremia because its serum concentrations were increased in rabbits with experimentally induced acute renal failure and because it inhibited the interaction of furosemide with bovine serum albumin via competitive inhibition [11].
Hakim, "The elephant in uremia: oxidant stress as a unifying concept of cardiovascular disease in uremia," Kidney International, vol.
Lin, "Generalized chorea in the syndrome of acute bilateral basal ganglia lesions in patients with diabetic uremia," Journal of Clinical Neuroscience, vol.
One of the causes can be either the delayed action of insulin due to the resistance of tissues in it, or insulin resistance in uremia.
ED is primarily organic in nature and is a result of uremia as well as the other comorbid conditions that frequently accompany the patients with ESRD.
Intensive dialysis including daily short dialysis is effective in majority of patients with uremia who develop pericarditis prior to dialysis.
Although uremia is a rare cause31 of pleural effusion, incidence and prevalence of renal failure is increasing in Pakistan and 15-20% of persons 40 years of age or older have reduced glomerular filtration rate.
For scientists and clinicians in nephrology, Niwa (advanced medicine for uremia, Nagoya U.
All these symp- toms combined together are clinically termed as uremia.
One month later Mrs Edgar passed away after battling uremia and acute nepphritis.
The statistical community of the research is including the whole male and female non-private schools at three levels of primary, guidance and high schools of 2nd District in Uremia City in the school year of 2012-2013 which their numbers are totally 452 ones in this regard.
Table Medical causes of visual hallucinations in children and adolescents Medical condition Symptom Neurologic Migraine withaura; migraine coma; familial hemiplegic migraines; temporal or occipital lobe seizures; ictal, postictal, or interict al psychosis; tumors inoccipital ortemporal lobes Ophthalmologic Cataracts, retinal diseases, glaucoma Inborn errors Homocysteine remethylation defects: urea cycle of metabolism disorders: GM2 gangliosidoses: Niemann-Pick disease, type C: alpha mannosidosis Delirium Metabolic disturbance, infection, intracranial process Metabolic Cardiopulmonary insufficiency, uremia, hepatic encephalopathy disease, vitamin deficiencies, inflammatory disease Source: References 4,5