urease


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urease

 [u´re-ās]
an enzyme that catalyzes the decomposition of urea to ammonia and carbon dioxide.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

u·re·ase

(yūr'ē-ās),
An enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of urea to carbon dioxide and ammonia; used as an antitumor enzyme; it is present in intestinal bacteria and accounts for most of the ammonia generated from urea in mammals.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

urease

(yo͝or′ē-ās′, -āz′) also

urase

(yo͝or′ās′, -āz′)
n.
An enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of urea to form ammonium carbonate.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

urease

An enzyme that breaks down urea to ammonia and carbon dioxide.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
Ureaseclick for a larger image
Fig. 312 Urease . The hydrolysis of urea.

urease

an enzyme that catalyses the hydrolysis of UREA into carbon dioxide and ammonia.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

u·re·ase

(yūr'ē-ās)
An enzyme used as an antitumor agent; it is present in intestinal bacteria.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
(2014) Lipoxygenase and Urease Inhibition of Extracts of Polygonatum verticillatum Rhizome: Augmented by its Isolated Compound, Santonin.
[beta]-glucosidase, urease, phosphatase and protease (an enzyme involved in the progressive decomposition of the N contained in proteins) activity in soils treated with compost was greater than in soils that were not treated with compost (Crecchio et al., 2004).
The coating of urea with sulphur, urease inhibitors and other biodegradable materials are the possible remedies to reduce N loss and enhance urea efficiency (Shaviv, 2001).
Dual specimens increase the diagnostic accuracy and reduce the reaction duration of rapid urease test.
AAM: arginin ammonification (mg N[H.sub.4.sup.+]-N [kg.sup.-1] soil [h.sup.-1]); ALP: alkalin phosphomonoesterase activity (mg PNP [g.sup.-1] soil [h.sup.-1]); ARS: arylsulphatase activity (mg PNP [g.sup.-1] soil [h.sup.-1]), LGL: L-glutaminase activity (mg N[H.sub.4.sup.+]-N [kg.sup.-1]soil [h.sup.-1]); LAS: L-asparaginase activity (mg N[H.sub.4.sup.+]-N [kg.sup.-1]soil [h.sup.-1]); URS: urease activity (mg N[H.sub.4.sup.+]-N [kg.sup.-1] soil [h.sup.-1])
A number of synthetic compounds including imidazoles, hydroxamic acids, and phosphazenes are effective urease inhibitors, but limited studies have been conducted on natural products (Ahmad et al.
The activities of soil urease, phosphatase, saccharase, and catalase in loam and clay soil were shown in Figures 4, 5, 6, and 7 and Table 1.
Scott, "Interactions amongthe seven Helicobacter pylori proteins encoded by the urease gene cluster," American Journal of Physiology: Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology, vol.
Keeping in view the antiulcer use of the plant, the current study was designed to investigate urease inhibitory properties of crude methanolic extract, total flavonoidal and sterol contents, and aqueous fraction of aerial parts of the plant in vitro.
(2008), soil saccharase activity is positively correlated with total nitrogen and available phosphorus, and urease activity is negatively correlated with the soil pH.
pylori status was determined using the rapid urease test (Pronto Dry).