urate

(redirected from urates)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.

urate

 [u´rāt]
a salt of uric acid.

u·rate

(yū'rāt),
A salt of uric acid.

urate

(yūr'āt)
A salt of uric acid.

urate

A salt of uric acid.
Urateclick for a larger image
Fig. 311 Urate . Molecular structure.

urate (uric acid)

an end product of PURINE degradation in humans, which is excreted in the urine. Purine degradation proceeds further in other mammals so that urate is oxidized and ALLANTOIN, for example, is excreted. In land animals such as reptiles and birds, urate is excreted as the final product of nitrogen metabolism, instead of UREA, in order to conserve water. Purines are synthesized using their excess amino nitrogen and then degraded to urate. By eliminating nitrogen in this way there is a minimum of water loss and the urate is excreted either as a thick paste or as dry pellets. A high amount of urate in serum can cause gout, a disease that affects the joints and kidneys. Formula: C5H4N4O3.
References in periodicals archive ?
Asymptomatic hyperuricaemia is the 1st stage of gout in which the serum urate levels are raised.
Chronic tophaceous gout is caused by the formation of solid urate deposits--tophi--in the connective tissues, predominately of the fingers, toes, elbows and ears.
(10) In this study of 5,707 participants in the 2007-2008 NHANES, 74% had HTN, 71% had CKD stage 2 or higher, 53% were obese, 26% had diabetes, 24% had nephrolithiasis, 14% had myocardial infarction, 11% had heart failure, and 10% had suffered a stroke; the prevalence of these comorbidities were also noted to increase with the degree of hyperuricemia, supporting the notion that serum urate is related to the presence of several gout comorbidities, either as a marker of disease or perhaps by itself exacerbating other diseases.
Results showed that the prevalence of gout, hyperuricemia, and high serum urate levels all significantly increased during the past 2 decades.
The chemistry of urates becomes more complicated once excreted by the kidneys.
The presence of monosodium urate monohydrate crystals in synovial fluid remains the gold standard for gout diagnosis, with a sensitivity of 84% and a specificity of 100%, according to new gout diagnostic guidelines issued by the European League Against Rheumatism.
If a 24-hour urine specimen is to be used for quantitative urate determination, NCCLS Document GP13-P does indeed state that the specimen should not be refrigerated.
The above studies link meat and seafood, but not protein or dairy, to high serum urate levels.
In theory, joints and synovial sheaths are target sites for urate deposits because the temperature is lower in these tissues than in the rest of the body, thereby lowering the solubility of sodium urate.
For example, they demonstrated that the adjuvant effect of the putative urate fraction was abrogated by the addition of uricase.
There were no significant differences in age, uric acid levels in urine, or serum urate levels at the beginning of the treatment (Table 2).
Of the remaining stone categories, urate or purine stones are the most common.