pitchblende

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pitch·blende

(pich'blend),
A mineral of pitchlike appearance, chiefly uranium dioxide, the main source of uranium and elements, such as radium, produced as a result of the radioactive breakdown of that element.
Synonym(s): uraninite

pitchblende

(pĭch′blĕnd)
Uraninite, the principal source of uranium. It is a mineral that resembles pitch.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Moreover, there are also rhenium occurrences associated with uraninites [35, 36].
A program of metallurgical studies is recommended to determine what proportion of the uranium is contained in uraninite versus apatite (a phosphorus-bearing mineral) and whether the uranium is separable from the phosphorus.
From a petrographic point of view, the main granite facies was classified as a weakly altered alkaline-feldspar granite with two micas, muscovite being dominant over biotite The accessory mineral association is very complex: ilmenite, zircon, monazite, xenotime, apatite, uraninite, cassiterite and primary sulphides (Perez del Villar and de la Cruz, 1989).
The other associated hydrothermal minerals are epidore, titanite, chlorite, muscovite, tourmaline, and minor amounts of opaque minerals such as sphalerite, chalcopyrite, uraninite, and autunite.
Uranium dioxide or uranium(IV) oxide (UO2), also known as urania or uranous oxide, is an oxide of uranium, and is a black, radioactive, crystalline powder that naturally occurs in the mineral uraninite.
Uraninite is the only primary uranium mineral identified in mineralogical studies to-date and is therefore similar to the INCA deposit and is expected to be compatible with the process proposed for the Omahola Project.
It is radioactive and is associated with accessory hematite, muscovite and uraninite.
Uraninite and occasionally coffinite are the U(IV) phases present in the veins and fractures throughout the system, whereas U(VI)-phosphates and gummites are found in shallow weathered zones of borehole SR4 and the Southern Fault.
Uranium minerals in unoxidized formations are primarily uraninite and coffinite while oxidized formations mainly contain uranium vanadates such as carnotite, tyuyamunite and metatyuyamunite.
He discovered the new minerals yttrialite and thorogummite (at Barringer Hill, Texas) and aguilarite (at Guanajuato, Mexico) and was the namesake for the mineral "nivenite"--now considered a variety of uraninite.
The example in figure 5 is a set of electron images which show a uraninite crystal, partially pseudomorphized by carbonates, and a long microfissure crosscutting the rock matrix from the source term to a small area where U-silicates have been precipitated.