urachal

u·ra·chal

(yūr'ă-kăl),
Relating to the urachus.

u·ra·chal

(yūr'ă-kăl)
Relating to the urachus.

urachal

(ū′ră-kăl) [Gr. ourachos, fetal urinary canal]
Rel. to the urachus.
References in periodicals archive ?
Other common differential etiologies include rectus sheath hematoma, abdominal wall abscess, lipoma, and urachal anomalies (2).
Foetal abdominal cystic lesions generally have their origin in the genitourinary system, such as hydronephrosis, renal dysplasia, ovarian cyst, and urachal cyst.
Urachal remnants may persist in approximately 32% of adults, (1) and clinically they can present as patent urachus (most common), umbilical-urachal sinus, vesicourachal diverticulum, and urachal cyst (second most common) depending on which portion of the urachus persists.
Urachal adenocarcinoma; primary adenocarcinoma of the bladder accounts for less than 1% of all bladder malignancies, of these 20-39% are of urachal origin (16,17).
Three of these patients had benign features on pathology (urachal remnant, amyloidosis, and inflammation) and the remaining 13 (0.4%) had stage Ta urothelial carcinoma (Table 2).
Subsequently, a contrast-enhanced abdominal and pelvic CT scan was performed, demonstrating a focal fluid collection contiguous with the bladder dome felt to represent a congenital or acquired/post-operative bladder diverticulum or atypical urachal remnant.
However causes of delayed separation of cord such as urachal anomalies, antibiotic administration, prematurity and low birth weight must be excluded.11,12
Our understanding of urachal cancer (UrC) has evolved since the seminal studies by Begg [6] in the 1930's following the first report by Hue and Jacquin [7] in 1863 and earlier works of Cullen in 1916 [8].
Urachal remnants result from incomplete regression of the fetal urachus [2].
Urachal cancer (UrC) is an uncommon neoplasm, representing 0.5-2% of all bladder cancer.
Urachal carcinoma is a rare malignant tumor, accounting for fewer than 1% of all primary bladder cancers [1].
The differential diagnosis of an adrenal pseudocyst essentially includes all the upper abdominal space-occupying lesions, such as splenic, hepatic, and renal cysts, as well as mesenteric or retroperitoneal cysts, urachal cysts, and solid adrenal tumours [9, 12, 13, 16].