ur-defenses

ur-de·fens·es

(yūr'dē-fens'ĕz),
A rarely used term for primitive defenses.
[Ger. ur-, primitive, earliest, + defenses]

Ur-defenses

[o̅o̅r′ dəfen′səs]
a set of three fundamental beliefs essential for psychological integrity of the individual, as proposed by Jules Masserman. They are a delusion of invulnerability and immortality, faith in a celestial order, and a wishful fantasy that fellow human beings are potential friends available for mutual service.

ur-de·fens·es

(ŭr'dĕ-fens'ĕz)
Fundamental beliefs essential to human psychological integrity (e.g., religion, science).
[Ger. ur-, primitive, earliest, + defenses]