upwelling


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upwelling

an upward movement of water masses that results in nutrients being brought to the surface. Regions of upwelling are regions of high ocean productivity, occurring, for example, off the Peruvian coast where there are major stocks of anchovies.
References in periodicals archive ?
The study showed that the upwelling air forms a series of narrow wisps that collectively can span more than 10 miles across, and which can also change their structure slowly as they transfer their energy.
She said sulfur upwelling was also reported in Balete town but there was no fish kill.
These factors are in turn modulated by dynamic structures such as eddies (cyclonic and anticyclonic), upwelling events and filaments, which due to their 1-100 km size are referred to as dynamic mesoscale structures (DMS).
Seeking to explore how short-term periods of elevated C[O.sub.2] from upwelling impact the bacteria in the water, researchers at the University of California, Santa Barbara, found that the additional C[O.sub.2]--and corresponding drop in pH--increases the respiration of these organisms.
This model seems to work well in absence of coastal upwelling events, since Avalos-Garcia et al.
The spread of warm, nutrient-poor Gulf Stream water onto the shelf prevents cold, nutrient-rich water from upwelling to the surface.
A team of geologists measured seismic activity across the U.S., finding vibrations that suggest an upwelling mass of rock underneath the northeastern region that stretches for a couple hundred miles.
There was a crucial moment when Ferguson, the death of Eric Garner and other outrages caused the spontaneous upwelling of #BLM demonstrations to resonate with broad swaths of the American public, even people who would not normally describe themselves as activists.
Engineers suspect it is the result of a sudden upwelling of subterranean springs.
Continuous recording of downwelling atmospheric radiation [L.sub.1] [down arrow] began in 2003, that of upwelling fluxes ([L.sub.1] [up arrow]) in July 2006.
Kevin Baines, Robert Carlson, and Thomas Momary (all jet Propulsion Laboratory) say the pigment in Jupiter's Great Red Spot is not red matter upwelling from below, but likely a product of ammonia and acetylene molecules being broken apart by ultraviolet sunlight in the planet's upper atmosphere.