central obesity

(redirected from upper-body obesity)

central obesity

Obesity defined as increased waist-to-hip and waist-to-thigh ratios, waist circumference and sagittal abdominal diameter, which is accompanied by an increased risk of cardiovascular disease.

central obesity

Abdominal obesity, truncal obesity Obesity defined by an ↑ waist-to-hip ratio, waist-to-thigh ratio, waist circumference, and sagittal abdominal diameter, and linked to an ↑ risk of cardiovascular events. See Body mass index, Obesity.
References in periodicals archive ?
A post-hoc analysis of another RCT found that metformin reduced fasting plasma glucose (FPG) levels in patients with upper-body obesity and metabolic syndrome (by 1999 World Health Organization criteria but not NCEPATP III criteria).
Upper-body obesity, glucose intolerance, hypertriglyceridaemia and hypertension.
8,9 A small-scale study conducted in women over 25 years of age living in a low-income community revealed a higher prevalence of 42% overweight and 8% obesity among women with upper-body obesity carrying higher risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD).
Men often have upper-body obesity, whereas peripheral obesity is the most common form among women.
The deadly quartet: Upper-body obesity, glucose intolerance, hypertriglyceridemia, and hypertension.
For these reasons, upper-body obesity is correlated with increased risk for heart disease, stroke, noninsulindependent diabetes mellitus, and some types of cancer; however, either type of obesity increases risk for high blood lipids, sleep apnea, osteoarthritis, abdominal hernias, varicose veins, gout, gallbladder disease, and complications during pregnancy and surgery.
And many women - as well as men - have upper-body obesity.
Other similarities to diabetes in Native Americans were suggested, including the influence of obesity, particularly upper-body obesity, a westernized lifestyle, and the presence of hyperinsulinism.
These characteristics include upper-body obesity, low concentrations of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) in the blood, high blood concentrations of fatty compounds, and a preponderance of the small, dense form of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) in the blood.
In the early 1980s, researchers linked upper-body obesity to diabetes and heart disease in both men and women (SN: 1/26/85, p.
The simplest way to tell if you've got upper-body obesity is to divide your waist measurement by your hip measurement.