upper extremity


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up·per limb

[TA]
the shoulder, arm, forearm, wrist, and hand.

up·per limb

(ŭp'ĕr lim) [TA]
The shoulder, arm, forearm, wrist, and hand.
Synonym(s): upper extremity.

upper extremity

The upper limb, including the shoulder, arm, forearm, wrist, and hand.
See also: extremity
References in periodicals archive ?
* At the initial assessment the motor function of the subject's upper extremity represented 51% of the normal one.
Ultrasound examination of proximal upper extremity vasculature is challenging due to the surrounding anatomy.
Initially, 47% of veterans of overseas contingency operations in support of the Global War on Terrorism (primarily OIF and OEF) who were treated at San Antonio Military Medical Center remained on active duty one year after combat-related, traumatic upper extremity amputations.
A PubMed literature search was conducted using the MeSH terms stroke, rehabilitation, upper extremity function, and neuromuscular electrical stimulation, and 71 articles were identified.
Maastricht Upper Extremity Questionnaire (MUEQ) and Revised Short Musculoskeletal Function Assessment (SMFA) Questionnaire [1, 16] were used for the assessment.
Next, we also recognize that many factors may influence individual resident upper extremity fracture case volume.
Systematic review of the effects of exercise therapy on the upper extremity of patients with spinal-cord injury.
Patients are typically wheelchair-bound and ultimately having to rely on others for daily care due to the loss of upper extremity function.
Schofield and Schwartz explain orthotic design and fabrication of the upper extremity to occupational and physical therapy students, entry-level practitioners, and experienced practitioners interested in improving their orthotic design and fabrication skills.
Breast cancer survivors may develop avoidance of physical activity and fear of movement which is called kinesiophobia due to upper extremity pain, numbness, restricted arm/shoulder range of motion, and risk of lymphedema.
In fact, there is growing evidence that demand for upper extremity arthroplasty will continue to grow in the immediate future.