unsaturated

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unsaturated

 [un-sach´er-āt″ed]
1. not having all affinities of its elements satisfied (unsaturated compound).
2. not holding all of a solute that can be held in solution by the solvent (unsaturated solution).
3. denoting compounds in which two or more atoms are united by double or triple bonds.

un·sat·ur·at·ed

(ŭn-sach'ŭr-āt'ĕd),
1. Not saturated; denoting a solution in which the solvent is capable of dissolving more of the solute.
2. Denoting a chemical compound in which all the affinities are not satisfied, so that still other atoms or radicals may be added to it.
3. In organic chemistry, denoting compounds containing double and/or triple bonds or a ring structure.

unsaturated

(ŭn-săch′ə-rā′tĭd)
adj.
1. Of or relating to an organic compound, especially a fatty acid, containing one or more double or triple bonds between the carbon atoms.
2. Capable of dissolving more of a solute at a given temperature.

un′sat·u·ra′tion n.

un·sat·ur·at·ed

(ŭn-sach'ŭr-āt-ĕd)
1. Not saturated; denoting a solution in which the solvent is capable of dissolving more of the solute.
2. Denoting a chemical compound in which all the affinities are not satisfied, so that still other atoms or radicals may be added to it.
3. organic chemistry Denoting compounds containing double and/or triple bonds.

unsaturated

Pertaining to a compound, especially of carbon, in which atoms are linked by double or triple valence bonds. A saturated compound has only single bonds. In general, unsaturated compounds are less stable than saturated compounds and can undergo a wider variety of reactions.
References in periodicals archive ?
Vazquez-Velez et al., "Effect of the unsaturation of the hydrocarbon chain of fatty-amides on the CO2-corrosion of carbon steel using EIS and real-time corrosion measurement," Journal of Spectroscopy, vol.
In the first step, peroxide mediated grafting of VTMS is carried out, resulting in some VTMS grafting but also in formation of some terminal unsaturation due to chain scission.
However, the first step is important to create unsaturation in the polymer that can be utilized in the silane grafting step of the process.
The peaks at 1.43-1.16 ppm correspond to the olefinic protons separated at least two carbons from the ester groups and at least one carbon from the unsaturations. Thus, in these peaks there are contributions from the elaeostearic and the oleic fatty acids considered in the structure.
The more clear changes with respect to the triglyceride are the disappearance of the peaks corresponding to protons in the unsaturations and the appearance of rather broad peak at 4.7-5.2 ppm corresponding to the hydroxyl protons.
* iodine reacts faster than thiol onto PE unsaturations. Indeed, iodine is often used to titrate PE unsaturations (26, 27),
This polymer obtained by the Philips process possesses more unsaturations than a polymer obtained from the Ziegler process (Table 1) (28).
Unsaturations and branches are claimed to influence strongly the stability of polyethylene [6, 10, 39-41].
The above presented results indicate that the amount of catalyst residues are not related to the chain structure of the virgin polymer powder, but play an important role during processing, since beside various other reactions [12, 42-44], they promote the formation of unsaturations. Stabilizers are expected to hinder radical reactions, thus the number of functional groups was expected to be independent of catalyst residue content in the stabilized samples.
To some extent, the effect of co-agents is very similar to the effect of third monomers, i.e., the pendant unsaturation of a third monomer acts as a co-agent already linked to the polymer chain and, thereby, competes with it for reaction with EPDM macro-radicals.
It is well known that ethylene/propylene co-polymers (EPM) generally require the incorporation of a certain amount of a non-conjugated diene as third monomer (EPDM), thereby providing pendant unsaturation to the polymer chain.