unsaturated

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unsaturated

 [un-sach´er-āt″ed]
1. not having all affinities of its elements satisfied (unsaturated compound).
2. not holding all of a solute that can be held in solution by the solvent (unsaturated solution).
3. denoting compounds in which two or more atoms are united by double or triple bonds.

un·sat·ur·at·ed

(ŭn-sach'ŭr-āt'ĕd),
1. Not saturated; denoting a solution in which the solvent is capable of dissolving more of the solute.
2. Denoting a chemical compound in which all the affinities are not satisfied, so that still other atoms or radicals may be added to it.
3. In organic chemistry, denoting compounds containing double and/or triple bonds or a ring structure.

unsaturated

/un·sat·u·rat·ed/ (un-sach´ur-āt″ed)
1. not holding all of a solute which can be held in solution by the solvent.
2. denoting compounds in which two or more atoms are united by double or triple bonds.
Enlarge picture
Unsaturated (A) and saturated (B) two-carbon hydrocarbons.

unsaturated

(ŭn-săch′ə-rā′tĭd)
adj.
1. Of or relating to an organic compound, especially a fatty acid, containing one or more double or triple bonds between the carbon atoms.
2. Capable of dissolving more of a solute at a given temperature.

un′sat·u·ra′tion n.

unsaturated

[unsach′ərātid]
Etymology: ME, un + L, saturare, to fill
1 adj, describing a solution that is capable of dissolving more of the solute; not saturated.
2 n, an organic compound in which one or more pairs of carbon atoms are united by double or triple bonds, as in unsaturated fatty acids. Also called unsaturated hydrocarbon. Compare saturated.

un·sat·ur·at·ed

(ŭn-sach'ŭr-āt-ĕd)
1. Not saturated; denoting a solution in which the solvent is capable of dissolving more of the solute.
2. Denoting a chemical compound in which all the affinities are not satisfied, so that still other atoms or radicals may be added to it.
3. organic chemistry Denoting compounds containing double and/or triple bonds.

unsaturated

Pertaining to a compound, especially of carbon, in which atoms are linked by double or triple valence bonds. A saturated compound has only single bonds. In general, unsaturated compounds are less stable than saturated compounds and can undergo a wider variety of reactions.

unsaturated

1. not having all affinities of its elements satisfied (unsaturated compound).
2. not holding all of a solute which can be held in solution by the solvent (unsaturated solution).
3. denoting compounds in which two or more atoms are united by double or triple bonds.

unsaturated fatty acids
see fatty acids.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ramos et al [3] reported a linear relationship between the degree of unsaturation, and cetane number of biodiesel.
With this degree of unsaturation, it would be expected that the development of a crosslinked network from SBO using autoxidation would require much longer drying times compared to a drying oil such as linseed oil which possesses on average 6.
Longer chain and unsaturated FAs can be subject to de novo transformations, which result in well established fractionations as chain length is systematically increased or as a double bond between carbons is created (making a point of unsaturation in a saturated FA).
The unsaturation of membrane lipids stabilizes photosynthesis against heat stress.
Increased unsaturation of the phospolipids or increase in sterol content at low temperatures is also reported for bivalves (Ueda 1974, Piretti et al.
3) Although the oxidative stability of these exotic butters is higher compared to oils with high unsaturations, they are still prone to rancidity and must be handled with care.
Quantitative determination of phospholipid compositions by ESIMS: effects of acyl chain length, unsaturation, and lipid concentration on instrument response.
Recent success at reducing the amount of unsaturation in PPG diols represents a major advance in polyurethane technology, according to BASF officials.
Whilst a high degree of unsaturation has been desirable for consumer appeal in processed foods, very often the oxidative activity this brings with it has posed problems in production and in the ultimate shelf life of the product.
Hydrogenation controls the Degree of saturation to unsaturation.
The two most important are the degree of unsaturation (double and triple carbon-carbon bonds) of the resin and the amount of oxygen present.
Cataldo, "On the ozone protection of polymers having non-conjugated unsaturation," Polymer Degradation and Stability, 72.