unsaturated fatty acid


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Related to unsaturated fatty acid: Triglycerides

un·sat·ur·at·ed fat·ty ac·id

a fatty acid, the carbon chain of which possesses one or more double or triple bonds (for example, oleic acid, with one double bond in the molecule, and linoleic acid, with two); called unsaturated because it is capable of absorbing additional hydrogen.

unsaturated fatty acid

a fatty acid in which some of the carbon atoms in the hydrocarbon chain are joined by double or triple bonds. These bonds are easily modified in chemical reactions, either by conversion to other functional groups or for conjugation to other molecules. Monounsaturated fatty acids have only one double or triple bond per molecule and are found as components of fats (triglycerides) in such foods as fowl, almonds, pecans, cashew nuts, peanuts, and olive oil. Polyunsaturated fatty acids have more than one double or triple bond per molecule and are found in fish, corn, walnuts, sunflower seeds, soybeans, cottonseeds, and safflower oil. Diets high in polyunsaturated fatty acids and low in saturated fatty acids have been correlated with low serum cholesterol levels in some study populations. Compare saturated fatty acid.

unsaturated fat

An alkyl-chain fatty acid with one or more double (ethylenic) bonds between carbons (called unsaturated as the chain is capable of absorbing more hydrogen). Unsaturated fats  (UFs) have lower melting points, and most are liquid at room temperature. UFs can be monounsaturated (i.e., have one double bond, such as oleic acid), which are widely distributed in nature, or polyunsaturated (i.e., has two or more double bonds, such as linolenic acid), which are found in safflower and corn oils.

un·sat·ur·at·ed fat·ty ac·id

(ŭn-sach'ŭr-āt-ĕd fat'ē as'id)
A fatty acid, the carbon chain of which possesses one or more double or triple bonds (e.g., oleic acid, with one double bond in the molecule, and linoleic acid, with two); called unsaturated because it is capable of absorbing additional hydrogen.

unsaturated fatty acid

A fatty acid with one double bond between carbons.

un·sat·ur·at·ed fat·ty ac·id

(ŭn-sach'ŭr-āt-ĕd fat'ē as'id)
A fatty acid, the carbon chain of which possesses one or more double or triple bonds.

unsaturated fatty acid,

n the glyceryl esters of certain organic acids in which some of the atoms are joined by double or triple valence bonds. These bonds are split easily in chemical reaction, and other substances are joined to them. Monounsaturated fatty acids have only one double or triple bond per molecule and are found in such foods as fowl, almonds, pecans, cashew nuts, peanuts, and olive oil. Polyunsaturated fatty acids have more than one double or triple bond per molecule and are found in fish, corn, walnuts, sunflower seeds, soybeans, and safflower oil.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ratio of unsaturated to saturated fatty acids: The ratio of unsaturated to saturated fatty acids were obtained by dividing the unsaturated fatty acids with saturated fatty acids.
This supports the hypothesis of sequential desaturation as the method of formation of unsaturated fatty acids in soyabean oil (Wilcox et al.
In most types of unsaturated fatty acids, the double bonds are separated by a single --C[H.
Unsaturated fatty acids have double bonds in the carbon-carbon chain.
However unsaturated fatty acids readily undergo oxidation at the carbon atoms adjacent to the double bond to form hydroperoxidase (McDonald et al.
It is rather interesting to note that this sponge was rich in unsaturated fatty acid esters indicating the dominance of heterotrophic feeding.
Oleic, linoleic, monounsaturated fatty acid (MUFA), polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA), unsaturated fatty acid (UFA), saturated fatty acid (SAFA) oleic/linoleic, MUFA/PUFA, SAFA/UFA contents of the seed oils are presented in Table 3.
The lipid sources were cod liver oil (highly unsaturated fatty acid rich diet, FO), sunflower oil (linoleic rich diet, SO diet), linseed oil (linolenic rich diet, LO), canola oil (monounsaturated rich diet, CO) and coconut oil (saturated rich diet, CNO) (Table 1).
It can be said presence of unsaturated fatty acid plus antioxidant causes significant decrease of [w.
The China Biochemistry Industry Association Seal Oil Committee was established to evaluate the merits of Seal Oil and unsaturated fatty acid (Omega 3) compounds in treating various diseases including, but not limited to Heart Disease, Blood pressure, Stroke, Mental illness, Diabetes II, Prostate disease, Psoriasis, Chemical liver injury, and to lower levels of blood lipids.
In contact with atmospheric oxygen, the unsaturated fatty acid derivatives these contain can easily oxidize, and light, heat and pressure make biofuels rancid within a short time, leading to short-chained fatty acids and insoluble polymers in the biodiesel.