pasteurization

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pasteurization

 [pas″ter-i-za´shun]
the process of heating milk or other liquids, e.g., wine or beer, to destroy microorganisms that would cause spoilage. The milk is held at 62°C for 30 minutes (LTHM, low temperature holding method, holding method), or heated rapidly to 80°C and held for 15–30 seconds (HTST, high temperature short time, flash method), and then chilled. The procedure kills most pathogenic bacteria while retaining the flavor of the liquid.

pas·teur·i·za·tion

(pas'tūr-i-zā'shŭn),
The heating of milk, wines, fruit juices, etc., for about 30 minutes at 68°C (154.4°F) whereby living bacteria are destroyed, but the flavor or bouquet is preserved; the spores are unaffected but are kept from developing by immediately cooling the liquid to 10°C (50°F) or lower.
See also: sterilization.
[L. Pasteur]

pasteurization

(păs′chər-ĭ-zā′shən, păs′tər-)
n.
1. The act or process of heating a food, especially a beverage such as milk or beer, to a specific temperature for a specific period of time in order to kill microorganisms that could cause disease, spoilage, or undesired fermentation.
2. The act or process of destroying most microorganisms in certain foods, such as raw meat or fresh fruits and vegetables, by irradiating them with gamma rays or other radiation to prevent spoilage.

pas·teur·i·za·tion

(pastyŭr-ī-zāshŭn)
The heating of milk, wines, and fruit juice for about 30 minutes at 68°C (154.4°F), whereby living bacteria are destroyed but the flavor or bouquet is preserved; the spores are unaffected but are kept from developing by immediately cooling the liquid to 10°C (50°F) or lower.
See also: sterilization
Synonym(s): pasteurisation.
[L. Pasteur]

pasteurization

A method of destroying infective micro-organisms in milk and other liquid foods. The liquid is rapidly heated to about 78 C and maintained at that temperature for fifteen seconds. It is then rapidly cooled to below 10 C. (Louis Pasteur, 1822–1895, French pioneer of bacteriology).

pasteurization

a method devised by Louis PASTEUR of partially sterilizing certain foods such as milk (by heating to 62 °C for 30 mins) before distribution. Heating destroys many harmful bacteria, including those responsible for tuberculosis. Nowadays, milk is generally pasteurized using higher temperatures (at least 72 °C, for at least 15 seconds); this is known as flash pasteurization or high-temperature short-time (HTST) pasteurization. This treatment not only kills pathogens but also reduces total bacterial counts, so that the milk will keep well in a refrigerator.

Pasteurization

The process of applying heat, usually to milk or cheese, for the purpose of killing, or retarding the development of, pathogenic bacteria.

Pasteur,

Louis, French chemist and bacteriologist, 1822-1895.
Pasteurella
Pasteurella aerogenes - species found in swine that can cause human wound infections following a pig bit.
Pasteurella multocida - bacterial species associated with dogs and cats.
Pasteurella pestis - Synonym(s): Yersinia pseudotuberculosis
Pasteurella "SP" - a rarely encountered organism that can cause infection after a guinea pig bite
Pasteurella tularensis - Synonym(s): Francisella tularensis
Pasteur effect - the inhibition of fermentation by oxygen, first observed by Pasteur.
Pasteur pipette - a cotton-plugged, glass tube drawn out to a fine tip, used for the sterile transfer of small volumes of fluid.
Pasteur vaccine
pasteurellosis - infection with bacteria of Pasteurella.
pasteurization - bacteria destruction process.
pasteurizer - pasteurization apparatus.

pas·teur·i·za·tion

(pastyŭr-ī-zāshŭn)
The heating of milk, wines, and fruit juices, for about 30 minutes at 68°C (154.4°F) whereby living bacteria are destroyed.
Synonym(s): pasteurisation.
[L. Pasteur]
References in periodicals archive ?
Consumers, particularly persons at high risk for listeriosis, are advised to avoid unpasteurized milk and dairy products made from unpasteurized milk.
Alcohol and aldehyde constituted 87.5%, 74.0%, 72.0%, and 69.3% in unpasteurized juice, UHT, LTLT, and HTST, respectively.
None of them admitted drinking unpasteurized milk, but 75 (65.7%) family members had a history of ingesting unpasteurized dairy products: 61 (53.5%) eating fresh cheese, seven (6.1%) using cream, and seven (6.1%) eating both fresh cheese and cream.
bovis was recognized as the causative agent, contacts who had positive test results were also asked about travel abroad and consumption of unpasteurized dairy products from Mexico.
Goats, sheep, and camels are natural hosts of B melitensis and consumption of their unpasteurized, infected milk and milk products (especially soft cheeses, ice cream, milk, and butter) leads to human disease.
This type of listeria is a life-threatening bacterium commonly found in raw animal products such as milk, eggnog and unpasteurized cheeses such as brie and roquefort.
Prepared at the request of the Maryland House of Delegates' Health and Operations Committee and in response to a bill that would legalize the sale of unpasteurized milk on farms, the analysis found that more than half of all milk-related foodborne illness in the U.S.
According to Samakov, retailers sell unpasteurized milk for 35-40 soms.
Dan Flynn, R-Canton, would allow licensed farmers to sell raw - or unpasteurized - milk at farmers markers and through direct delivery to consumers.
This winter, stay healthy by stocking your fridge with foods like miso soup, sour pickles, unpasteurized sauerkraut, sourdough bread and soft cheeses like Gouda.
L-citrulline in the natural juice (unpasteurized), however, seemed to be more bioavailable--in a form the body could better use, the study found.
-- Aged cheese made from unpasteurized milk is not pathogen free and has been responsible for numerous food poisoning outbreaks, Dr.