unobtrusive

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unobtrusive

(ŭn″ŏb-troo′siv)
Tending to blend in rather than stand out; barely perceptible; subtle.
unobtrusiveness (′siv-nĕs)
References in periodicals archive ?
Although any objective assessment for the visibility and unobtrusiveness of the embedded visible watermark is not established, we try to assess the watermark visibility computing the PSNR between the translucent visible watermarked images and the opaque watermark superimposed image.
Whether entangled in a fox-fur rug, wiping the mouth of his dining table neighbor with his sleeve or accidentally setting off a whole shed-full of fireworks, Hulot's efforts at unobtrusiveness set off a train of spectacular disasters.
In 1998, perhaps before her emphasis on poetic education in metrical verse, Perloff works on a definition of "free verse" in her essay "After Free Verse: The New Non-Linear Poetries" basing her classification upon free verse that depends "upon the unobtrusiveness of sound structure ...
Little characterizes this as "the unobtrusiveness of Mary." (25) She points to the
Frequent use, history, unobtrusiveness, diversity, generativity, and endurance all figure into the survival of rumors or expressions.
AVG 8.0 delivers a significant number of new benefits to users designed to deliver enhanced protection against the latest web-borne threats without sacrificing the product's signature efficiency and unobtrusiveness.
Metcalf (2002: 152) suggests that the success of new words could be predicted by applying the so called FUDGE scale that includes five significant factors: Frequency of use, Unobtrusiveness, Diversity of users and situations, Generation of other forms and meanings and Endurance of the concept.
A TabletPC is a valuable hardware option for clinical staff because of its portability, versatility, and unobtrusiveness
In kings' courts he lives best who is least seen." This unobtrusiveness he managed, and when civil war broke out during his late sixties, he continued to manage it.
Collected Poems is less disruptive than Birthday Letters in this respect, as it appears clearly within one domain and not the other, and presents itself not as a marketed product but as an intellectual tool and cultural artifact--an effect achieved in part (as with any such collection) by crediting Hughes as author of a book whose contents are arranged by someone else, thus framing the collection as a presentation of what already exists rather than a construction of new knowledge and leading reviewers to comment appreciatively on the editor's unobtrusiveness.
(1) Unobtrusiveness: After a watermark is embedded to the original image, the human eye cannot recognize the watermarked image.