unmask

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unmask

(ŭn″mask′)
To reveal or make evident a disguised clinical condition, e.g., by treating a different condition that made it difficult to perceive the first condition.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
For two decades Tom--or Joey, as his buddies from the old neighborhood like to call him--manages to hide out among the quiet townsfolk of a sleepy Indiana burg, only to be unmasked when he commits a violent act of heroism that evokes cheers from his neighbors and catches the attention of old friends interested in settling accounts.
These perverts must be unmasked and brought to justice.
She prides herself on being "the scandal of the neighborhood," bragging about sleeping with all the guys, and her job in the play is to offer redemption to James, who, in turn, unmasks the innocent virgin who lives beneath Josie's bluff exterior.
What work each Shakespeare play does is wildly various: for Delaney and Cohen it reflects and allays economic anxieties; for Montrose it provides psychological "compensation"; for Bristol (Othello) it defamiliarizes social structure through the carnivalesque; for Sinfield (Macbeth) and Weimann it reflects legitimation crisis; for Greenblatt it manages affect; for Drakakis (Julius Caesar) it unmasks politics and challenges official ideology; for Andreas (Othello rewritings) it resists dominant ideologies such as racism; for Maus it reveals social life generally in the need to assume private subjectivity; for Boose it insulates and prettifies the "real" history of silenced women.
"Citation," in the way that Butler uses it, unmasks the artificiality, the constructed character, of norms we inhabit as "natural:" norms of gender, of sexuality, of race, of religious identity.
Picard eventually unmasks the imposters but finds that they do not know how to close the gateways.
Is all this magic the collective wish for something that, outside law or reason, unmasks normality?
Driven by war and famine into the hostile refuge of Venice, where their wives had fled before them, the protagonists of The Veteran and of Weasel confront broken domestic lives; in both cases an encounter with a wife - lost to a Bravo in The Veteran, to a wealthy, elderly Venetian in Weasel unmasks desperation and provokes violence.
"It seems likely that playing or watching [video games] does not cause normal persons to develop a seizure disorder but only unmasks a peculiar proclivity of the brains of certain individuals," write William D.