unlicensed assistive personnel


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unlicensed assistive personnel

(pĕr-sŏn-nĕl′),

UAP

Unlicensed health care personnel who work under the direction of a registered nurse. In addition to delivering direct patient care, they may take blood samples, provide respiratory treatments, or keep track of medical records. Some UAPs are multiskilled. Each state regulates UAP practice independently.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
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* Unlicensed assistive personnel must complete a standard program of education and gaining for unlicensed assistive personnel in dialysis, with continuing educational requirements after the completion of the education program.
Delegation to unlicensed assistive personnel is a challenging area for professional nurses (Boucher, 1998).
At the present time, 22 states expressly permit dialysis technicians or unlicensed assistive personnel to administer heparin as ordered to initiate or terminate a hemodialysis treatment.
Position statement on registered nurse utilization of unlicensed assistive personnel. The American Nurse, 25(2), 7-8.
Students functioning as unlicensed assistive personnel (UAPs) for compensation may only perform tasks that do not require the use of independent nursing judgment as described in [section] 224.8(c), Nursing Tasks Prohibited from Delegation.
This means in certain settings registered nurses are permitted to "delegate" certain nursing tasks to unlicensed assistive personnel (UAPs).
Only 24% of the nurses said they dispensed all medications; the others delegated the duty to unlicensed assistive personnel, who most often were school secretaries (J.
American Nurses' Association position statement on registered nurse utilization of unlicensed assistive personnel, NAS Newsletter, 10(2), 10-12.
To maintain essential services or to expand the school nurses' proactive role, an increasing number of school systems are using unlicensed assistive personnel to support the delivery of health services to students.
The recent increase in unlicensed assistive personnel (UAP) at the bedside also raises some questions about scope of practice.
Many pediatric nurses are working in environments where registered nurses are being replaced with unlicensed assistive personnel (UAP).