unlicensed assistive personnel


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unlicensed assistive personnel

health care workers who are not licensed but are prepared to provide certain elements of patient care under the supervision of a registered nurse. Unlicensed assistive personnel include patient care technicians, nurses' aides, and certified nursing assistants.

unlicensed assistive personnel

(pĕr-sŏn-nĕl′),

UAP

Unlicensed health care personnel who work under the direction of a registered nurse. In addition to delivering direct patient care, they may take blood samples, provide respiratory treatments, or keep track of medical records. Some UAPs are multiskilled. Each state regulates UAP practice independently.
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References in periodicals archive ?
STATE LAWS AND/OR REGULATIONS GENERALLY ALLOWING PHYSICIAN DELGATION TO UNLICENSED ASSISTIVE PERSONNEL (UAPs) Alaska 12 Alaska Admin.
American Nurses' Association position statement on registered nurse utilization of unlicensed assistive personnel, NAS Newsletter, 10(2), 10-12.
NAPNES) to co-develop educational courses and online learning programs for medication technicians, nurse aides and other unlicensed assistive personnel who want to become licensed practical nurses (LPNs).
AD/Diploma prepared RNs, LPNs and unlicensed assistive personnel work under the direction of a School Nurse providing high quality nursing care to our state's pupils.
This clarification confirmed that Georgia law is consistent with the laws of the vast majority of states regarding delegation of injections to unlicensed assistive personnel.
As you will recall, The Pulse over the last several issues has provided news of these changes which expand the scope of delegation to multiple types of unlicensed assistive personnel and to all nursing sites, including acute and long term care facilities.
With hospitals downsizing their RN staffs, some to dangerously low levels, and increasing the use of unlicensed assistive personnel, this decision is vital to protect nurses and their patients," said Virginia Trotter Betts, president of the American Nurses Association.