universalizability principle

universalizability principle

[yo̅o̅′nivur′səlī′zəbil′itē]
a principle that an act is good if everyone should, in similar circumstances, do the same act without exception.
References in periodicals archive ?
What people don't typically understand is that the logic of the separation of powers is a logic that renders operational what the philosophers call the universalizability principle or the categorical imperative: it puts the question of what the principle is behind one's position and whether he would be willing to honor the same principle when it cuts against his interests.
versions of the Golden Rule that are not limited by family, neighbor, religion, nationality, or species, versions of the utilitarian principle that include all sentient beings in the calculation, or some sort of universalizability principle that applies to all rational beings).
Although other scholars have started with Flathman's universalizability principle, they have focused instead on the recurring constitutional values that public servants appeal to when they use the phrase "in the public interest.
The universalizability principle that supplements a "professional ethics" for criminal justice practitioners may be best understood if we compare the practice of criminal justice with those of law and medicine.