uniparental


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uniparental

(ū″nĭ-pă-rĕn′tĭl) [″ + ″]
Relating to or derived from a single parent.
References in periodicals archive ?
Developmental interactions between Spodoptera exigua (Noctuidae: Lepidoptera) and its uniparental endoparasitoid, Meteorus pulchricornis (Braconidae: Hymenoptera).
In a complete molar pregnancy, both sets of chromosomes are from the father, a condition known as paternal uniparental disomy (UPD).
SNP chips are considered superior for detecting uniparental disomy and copy neutral loss of heterozygosity.
Mitochondrial DNA is a popular molecular marker because it is uniparental and has a high evolutionary rate, lack of introns, large copy number in every cell, and limited recombination (Galter et al.
Discordant results between fetal karyotyping and non-invasive prenatal testing by maternal plasma sequencing in a case of uniparental disomy 21 due to trisomic rescue.
Loss of centromeric histone H3 (CENH3) from centromeres precedes uniparental chromosome elimination in interspecific barley hybrids.
Maladaptive behavior differences in Prader-Willi syndrome due to paternal deletion versus maternal uniparental disomy.
In systems with uniparental care, caretakers of embryos will have more opportunity to pass on female memes, or 'messages,' to the embryo.
We also consider the factors that enable some hummingbirds to initiate breeding attempts in rapid succession despite the challenges of uniparental care of altricial young.
The 3 months of biparental care of their single altricial chick is followed by 9-14 months of uniparental care by the mother (Diamond, 1972, 1973; osorno, 1999; Osorno and Szekely, 2004).
Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), because of its uniparental (maternal) mode of inheritance, is not useful for the initial identification of Fl hybrids but, when combined with nuclear markers, can allow the maternal parent of a hybrid to be recognized and may provide evidence for inter-/intraspecific hybridization.
Alternatively, there may be copy number-neutral loss of heterozygosity (LOH), also known as acquired uniparental disomy, caused by a mitotic segregation error with loss of one allele and reduplication of the remaining allele or by segmental mitotic recombination between pairs of high-identity, low-copy repeats, among other mechanisms.