unilobar


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u·ni·lo·bar

(yū'ni-lō'băr),
Having but one lobe.

unilobar

(yo͞o′nə-lō′bər, -bär′)
adj.
Having only one lobe.

u·ni·lo·bar

(yū'ni-lō'bahr)
Having but one lobe.
References in periodicals archive ?
Although a conclusion that liver resection could prolong the OS for PNET patients with liver metastases was easily acquired, we could not overlook the fact that liver resection group have more unilobar hepatic metastases which means there were more patients with resectable liver metastases.
Based on the above imaging tests and FOB findings, the diagnosis of scimitar syndrome with unilobar right lung was made.
TEE revealed LA with dense SEC and thrombus 15 mm along (Figure 8) the posterior LA wall near interatrial septum (Figure 9), unilobar LAA (Figure 10) with low ostial emptying velocities <20 cm/sec and thrombus 8 mm and few nonembolic thin thoracic aorta plaques.
coinfection radiograph) 1 No Bipulmonary 2 No Unilobar 3 No Bipulmonary 4 No Bipulmonary 5 No No 6 Enterococcus faecium Bipulmonary 7 No Bipulmonary 8 No Bipulmonary 9 No Bipulmonary 10 Enterococcus cloacae, Achromobacter sp.
Among 70 patients with brain MRIs, 29 of the survivors (54%) had unilobar PML extensions, compared with 2 (12%) of those who died.
Findings included bilateral infiltrates in 66 patients, a unilobar infiltrate in 26, and multilobar infiltrates in two
Of the 25 patients who had chest radiographs, 15 (60%) had abnormalities suggestive of pneumonia, including 10 with multilobar infiltrates and five with unilobar infiltrates.
That remarkable work, reported in a purely descriptive way by Hamburger and Robertson at the University of Chicago, was undertaken in spontaneously breathing dogs with the intent of determining how multi-lobar pneumonia evolved from unilobar infection.
In the past, the decision to resect CRLM was relatively straightforward; on the basis of studies that established certain adverse clinicopathological factors, liver resection was attempted only in patients who had one to three unilobar metastases, preferably presenting at least 12 months after resection of the primary tumour, whose disease was resectable with at least a 1 cm margin of healthy liver tissue and who had no hilar lymphadenopathy or extra-hepatic disease.
Presumably the postoperative patients had unilobar or segmental atelectasis e.g.
Causes of Diffuse Alveolar Hemorrhage Goodpasture syndrome (antiglomerular basement membrane antibody disease) Vasculitides (especially Wegener granulomatosis) Mitral stenosis Bronchiectasis (often unilateral, or unilobar) Immunoglobulin A nephropathy Behcet syndrome Certain systemic collagen vascular diseases (especially systemic lupus erythematosus) Antiphospholipid syndrome Human immunodeficiency virus infection Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease Idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis Drug reactions, including toxic reactions and anticoagulants Acute lung allograft rejection Isolated capillaritis Table 5.
The radiological manifestations of CAP were analysed in terms of the nature of the infiltrate (homogeneous, patchy, interstitial) and its extent (unilobar or multilobar).