unification

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unification,

n the act of uniting or the condition of being united (e.g., the result of joining the components of a removable partial denture by connectors).
References in periodicals archive ?
In the December 1990 elections, the controlling party (the Christian Democrats) led by Chancellor Helmut Kohl, advocated tighter asylum laws to ease the economic and social burdens of unification.
By 1992 the hardships of unification created intense feelings of xenophobia, especially among younger generations.
Two different unification concerns (with constitutional implications) are raised by this discussion.
This discussion of the Thirty-Ninth Amendment contributes in two ways to the development of the Constitutional Model of German Unification: (1) the Amendment is an arguably negative constitutional consequence of avoiding the political asylum issue in the unification treaties; and (2) the Amendment is an arguably negative constitutional reaction to the social and political pressures of unification.
212) Immediately prior to unification one German leader estimated that the total cost of upgrading East German transport systems would be DM 200 billion.
218) The Court's decision indicates that the Federal Government intended to use Article 87e as a means of swiftly upgrade the eastern German railway system; an intent that is consistent with the economic and infrastructure pressures arising from unification.
Both unification treaties addressed the issue of privatizing public enterprises.
First, neither unification treaty precluded privatization through Basic Law amendment.
Second, neither unification treaty precluded privatization of former West German public enterprises.
This discussion lends three elements to the development of a Constitutional Model of German Unification: (1) the privatization provisions of the two unification treaties were flexible enough to allow the united Germany to privatize through Basic Law amendment; (2) the privatization provisions of the two unification treaties were flexible enough to provide for the privatization of former West German public enterprises, even though privatization of former West German public enterprises would require Basic Law amendments; and (3) Germany's constitutional solution to the economic problem of the eastern German railways may indicate a willingness to solve other major unification problems with Basic Law amendments.
In accordance with Article 5 of the Unification Treaty the united German legislature formed a Joint Constitutional Commission to investigate the necessity of further amending the Basic Law to conform to the realities of unification.
The changes affecting Articles 3 and 20a were recommended and passed in state objective language; Article 5 of the Unification Treaty had recommended consideration of whether state objectives should be inserted into the Basic Law.

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