fermentation

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fermentation

 [fer″men-ta´shun]
the anaerobic enzymatic conversion of organic compounds, especially carbohydrates, to simpler compounds, especially to lactic acid or ethyl alcohol, producing energy in the form of ATP.

fer·men·ta·tion

(fĕr'men-tā'shŭn),
1. A chemical change induced in a complex organic compound by the action of an enzyme, whereby the substance is split into simpler compounds.
2. In bacteriology, the anaerobic dissimilation of substrates with the production of energy and reduced compounds; the mechanism of fermentation does not involve a respiratory chain or cytochrome, hence oxygen is not the final electron acceptor as it is in oxidation.
[L. fermento, pp. -atus, to ferment, from L. fermentum, yeast]

fermentation

(fûr′mən-tā′shən, -mĕn-)
n.
Any of a group of chemical reactions induced by microorganisms or enzymes that split complex organic compounds into relatively simple substances, especially the anaerobic conversion of sugar to carbon dioxide and alcohol by yeast.

fer·men·ta·tion

(fĕr'mĕn-tā'shŭn)
1. A chemical change induced in a complex organic compound by the action of an enzyme, whereby the substance is split into simpler compounds.
2. bacteriology The anaerobic dissimilation of substrates with the production of energy and reduced compounds; the mechanism of fermentation does not involve a respiratory chain or cytochrome, hence oxygen is not the final electron acceptor as it is in oxidation.
[L. fermento, pp. -atus, to ferment, from L. fermentum, yeast]

fermentation

  1. See ALCOHOLIC FERMENTATION.
  2. any industrial process involving the large-scale culturing of cells in either aerobic or anaerobic conditions, using fermenters.

fer·men·ta·tion

(fĕr'mĕn-tā'shŭn)
1. A chemical change induced in a complex organic compound by enzyme action, whereby a substance is split into simpler compounds.
2. In bacteriology, anaerobic dissimilation of substrates with production of energy and reduced compounds.
[L. fermento, pp. -atus, to ferment, from L. fermentum, yeast]
References in periodicals archive ?
However, bread made from fermented cassava flour had higher scores than bread made from the unfermented cassava flour and the reason might be attributed to the modification of the flour functionality properties as reported in a similar study where cassava flours produced from tubers which were steeped for 24 hours and treated with citric acid produced breads with improved quality characteristics [23].
Leptin secretion was increased 1.9-fold (p < 0.001), 2-fold (p < 0.001) and 1.7-fold (p < 0.01) by fermented and unfermented C.
In the starter phase, the total tract apparent digestibility of dry matter and phosphorus was higher (p<0.05) for birds fed fermented rapeseed meal than unfermented rapeseed meal.
In each round, three cups of unfermented juice (30 mL) and three cups (30 mL) of fermented juice were served in randomized order for all judges in ISO wine tasting glasses in tasting booths at 25[degrees]C.
A total of 92 samples comprising makaka, kanyakaska, kadonoska, fermented and unfermented flour, scrapes and grates were collected in February 2008 and another 88 samples comprising makaka, fermented flours, kanyakaska and kadonoska were collected in March 2009.
The unfermented beer is then further strained through a bed of juniper branches and boiled with more leaves and berries.
The expression of PPAR[gamma] isoform 2 was decreased by 43% (p<0.01), 59% (p<0.001), 61% (p < 0.001) and 30% (p < 0.05) by fermented and unfermented C.
Made from unfermented leaves, green tea contains particularly high levels of polyphenols that act as powerful antioxidants.
On two vintages of Vignoles, a French-American hybrid variety typically vinified with some RS, batches got their sugar through multiple methods: stopped fermentation, reintroduction of unfermented juice after dry fermentation, and a mute addition (partially fermented juice/wine) after dry fermentation.
Suitable foods are sweet fruits, leafy green vegetables, most pulses, unfermented dairy products, wheat, barley, oats, and rice.
The process known as mutage immediately arrests the fermentation, allowing the now fortified wine to retain its natural sweetness from the unfermented grape sugars, producing a beverage between 18-20 degrees.
At issue is the question of whether wineries should be allowed to pump up their flavors with concentrated "must" (unfermented grape juice) or work with what nature gave them.