ethics

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ethics

 [eth´iks]
1. a branch of philosophy dealing with values pertaining to human conduct, considering the rightness and wrongness of actions and the goodness or badness of the motives and ends of such actions.
2. systematic rules or principles governing right conduct. Each practitioner, upon entering a profession, is invested with the responsibility to adhere to the standards of ethical practice and conduct set by the profession. adj., adj eth´ical.
applied ethics practical ethics.
descriptive ethics a type of nonnormative ethics that simply reports what people believe, how they reason, and how they act.
medical ethics the values and guidelines governing decisions in medical practice.
nonnormative ethics ethics whose objective is to establish what factually or conceptually is the case, not what ethically ought to be the case. Two types are descriptive ethics and metaethics.
normative ethics an approach to ethics that works from standards of right or good action. There are three types of normative theories: virtue theories, deontological theories, and teleological theories.
nursing ethics the values and ethical principles governing nursing practice, conduct, and relationships. The Code for Nurses, adopted by the American Nurses' Association (ANA) in 1950 and revised periodically, is intended to provide definite standards of practice and conduct that are essential to the ethical discharge of the nurse's responsibility. Further information on the Code, interpretative statements that clarify it, and guidance in implementing it in specific situations can be obtained from committees and councils on nursing practice of State Nurses' Associations or from the ANA Nursing Practice Department.
practical ethics the attempt to work out the implications of general theories for specific forms of conduct and moral judgment; formerly called applied ethics.
professional ethics the ethical norms, values, and principles that guide a profession and the ethics of decisions made within the profession.

eth·ics

(eth'iks),
The branch of philosophy that deals with the distinction between right and wrong, with the moral consequences of human actions.
[G. ethikos, arising from custom, fr. ethos, custom]

ethics

(1) The study of fundamental principles which define values and determine moral duties and obligations.
 
(2) Moral codes of practice concerned with: behaviour (moral conduct)—e. g. unprofessional behaviour, such as direct discrimination; legal, religious, social and personal concerns (moral issues); and debates within society—e.g. euthanasia vs. prolonging the life of a terminally-ill person.

eth·ics

(eth'iks)
1. The branch of philosophy that deals with the distinction between right and wrong, with the moral consequences of human actions.
2. nursing Philosophy or code about what is ideal in human character and conduct; principles of right or wrong accepted by individual or group; study of morals and moral choices.
[G. ethikos, arising from custom, fr. ethos, custom]

eth·ics

(eth'iks)
The branch of philosophy that deals with the distinction between right and wrong and with the moral consequences of human actions.
[G. ethikos, arising from custom, fr. ethos, custom]

Patient discussion about ethics

Q. The cobbler's shoes are never fixed A bit philosophical/ethical question: do you think it’s a appropriate to an alternative therapist to treat people with disease he or she has and can’t cure himself?

A. Even dietitian can suffer from depression and eat too much, or a gym coach that suffers from injury that prevents him or her from exercising. The knowledge and capabilities are not dependent on the specific situation of the therapist, not to mention the many explanations for such cases.

However, I do agree it may seem a bit suspicious…

More discussions about ethics
References in periodicals archive ?
Therefore, these employees are not susceptible to the influence of ethical leadership and continue to avoid responsibility for their own unethical behaviors through moral justification.
Kish-Gephart, Harrison, and Trevino (2010) define unethical intentions as the expression of one's willingness or commitment to engage in an unethical behavior and, within an organizational context, unethical behavior as any organizational member's action that violates generally-accepted societal moral norms.
If the individuals responsible for creating and implementing the controls are themselves unethical, no internal controls can be effective; in fact, research has shown that although internal controls are important, they cannot eliminate fraud on their own (Howard Rockness and Joanne Rockness, "Legislated Ethics: From Enron to Sarbanes-Oxley, the Impact on Corporate America," Journal of Business Ethics, 2005, pp.
This behaviour will result in bad publicity and the companies may have to wind up their businesses due to the high cost of unethical behaviour.
Geraldine Burton Corwen, Denbighshire IT'S disgusting that any money should be going CASH to firms accused of unethical behaviour.
Most individuals would regard behaviors to enhance an opportunity to receive a positive performance evaluation, pecuniary reward, or organizational acclaim and recognition as unethical. Many compensation experts believe that organizations can eliminate incentives to manipulate budgets or quotas and/or manage earnings only if managerial incentive contracts do not include accounting measures.
They have often been unethical. They have been trying to break the young players away.
Giacalone (human resources management, Temple University) and Promislo (management, Rider University) advocate a human-centered approach to unethical behavior in the workplace, focusing on the impact of unethical behavior on individuals and on the well-being of the organization as a whole.
But green campaigners are lobbying the PM to challenge "unethical" biofuel from foods.
MAN UTD: Sir Alex Ferguson believes the "unethical" manner of Mark Hughes' sacking by Manchester City could help trigger a Devon Loch-style collapse next week that opens the Barclays Premier League title door for Manchester United.
Studies of unethical behavior show significantly more cheating, law breaking, and other deceptive and harmful activities committed by individuals in higher socioeconomic strata.
The upper class has a higher propensity for unethical behavior, being more likely to believe that "greed is good," according to a new study.