undine


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undine

 [un´dēn]
a small glass flask for irrigating the eye.

un·dine

(ŭn'dēn, -dīn),
A small glass flask that was used in irrigation of the conjunctiva.
[Mod. L. undina, fr. L. unda, wave]
References in periodicals archive ?
They even kill off the husbands similarly: like Littleton, Bragdon (Milly's husband) and Marvell (Undine's) succumb under the strain of uncongenial work and their wives' impossible demands (though the latter commits suicide).
Describing the role which Scarlett is expected to play, Deadline reveals that "Undine is as unscrupulous as she is magnetically beautiful" who rises to "the top of New York's high society from her nouveau riche roots" but does not have a happy life because of her huge aspirations.
(43) In Bekenntnis schilderte Franz dem Erzahler sein Gluck mit Else: "o, ein Gluck!-Ich hatte einst den Fouqueschen Ritter Huldbrand beneidet, wie er mit einer Undine seine Brautnacht feiert; ich hatte nicht gedacht, dab dergleichen unter Menschen moglich sei", Storm, Ein Bekenntnis, 594.
Meanwhile, Jeff spies his woman, Undine, behind a beaded curtain, kissing another.
In contrast, Devana Chasma, Navka Planitia, and Undine Planitia are brighter due to their low elevations.
Central to the novel's consideration of print is an assessment of tabloid culture's impact on Undine Spragg, the novel's energetic main figure, and a polity comprised of media consumers.
Two artist records were set: Isamu Noguchi's Undine (Nadja) soared to $4,226,500 (est.
Two artist records were set: Isamu Noguchi's Undine (Nadja) soared to $4,226,500 and Salvador DalUa's Spectre du soir sur la plage totaled $5,682,500.
In The House of Mirth, Madame Regina's milliners both imitate and produce the fashions of the New York City aristocracy, while Undine Spragg of The Custom of the Country imagines "'artistic' dresses" as signs of marriage to a successful author (250).
Her name is clearly related to undine a water elemental from European folklore and a sentient sofa at one point compares her to Botticelli's Venus.
After the MacDonald comes one of the classic literary fairy-tales, or marchen, of German Romanticism, Friedrich de la Motte Fouque's Undine [1811], the tale of the tragic love between a human knight and a beautiful but soul-less elemental, the water-spirit Undine.
"After World War II Latvian theatre was subjected to ideological pressures from the Soviet authorities and was forced to resort to Aesop's language," says Undine Adamaite, arts journalist for Diena, Riga's daily newspaper.