hypoventilation

(redirected from underventilation)
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Related to underventilation: premenarchal, intracorporeal, QID

hypoventilation

 [hi″po-ven″tĭ-la´shun]
a state in which there is a reduced amount of air entering the pulmonary alveoli (decreased alveolar ventilation), which causes an increase in arterial carbon dioxide level. See also hypopnea and bradypnea.

hy·po·ven·ti·la·tion

(hī'pō-ven'ti-lā'shŭn),
Reduced alveolar ventilation relative to metabolic carbon dioxide production, so that alveolar carbon dioxide pressure increases above normal.
Synonym(s):

hypoventilation

/hy·po·ven·ti·la·tion/ (-ven″tĭ-la´shun) reduction in amount of air entering pulmonary alveoli.
primary alveolar hypoventilation  impairment of automatic control of respiration, resulting in apnea during sleep.

hypoventilation

(hī′pə-vĕn′tl-ā′shən)
n.
Reduced or deficient ventilation of the lungs, resulting in reduced aeration of blood in the lungs and an increased level of carbon dioxide in the blood.

hypoventilation

[-ven′tilā′shən]
Etymology: Gk, hypo + L, ventilare, to fan
an abnormal condition of the respiratory system that occurs when the volume of air that enters the alveoli and takes part in gas exchange is not adequate for the body's metabolic needs. It is characterized by cyanosis, polycythemia, increased PaCO2, and generalized decreased respiratory function. Hypoventilation may be caused by an uneven distribution of inspired air (as in bronchitis), obesity, neuromuscular or skeletal disease affecting the thorax, decreased response of the respiratory center to carbon dioxide, or a reduced amount of functional lung tissue, as in atelectasis, emphysema, and pleural effusion. The results of hypoventilation are hypoxia, hypercapnia, pulmonary hypertension with cor pulmonale, and respiratory acidosis. Treatment includes weight reduction in cases of obesity, artificial respiration, and possibly tracheostomy. Compare hyperventilation. See also respiratory center.

hypoventilation

Medtalk A ↓ in depth/frequency of respiration. Cf Hyperventilation.

hy·po·ven·ti·la·tion

(hī'pō-ven-ti-lā'shŭn)
Reduced alveolar ventilation relative to metabolic carbon dioxide production, so that alveolar carbon dioxide pressure increases above normal.

hypoventilation

Reduced depth and rate of breathing.

Hypoventilation

Reduced ventilation in the lungs' air sacs resulting in above normal carbon dioxide pressure.
Mentioned in: Inhalation Therapies

hypoventilation (hīˈ·pō·vēnˈ·t·lāˑ·shn),

n breathing dysfunction characterized by insufficient respiration, resulting in inadequate oxygenation and build-up of excess carbon dioxide in the body.

hy·po·ven·ti·la·tion

(hī'pō-ven-ti-lā'shŭn)
Reduced alveolar ventilation relative to metabolic carbon dioxide production increases above.

hypoventilation,

n an abnormal condition of the respiratory system, characterized by cyanosis, polycythemia, increased carbon dioxide arterial tension, and generalized decreased respiratory function. Hypoventilation occurs when the volume of air that enters the alveoli and takes part in gas exchanges is not adequate for the metabolic needs of the body.

hypoventilation

reduction in the amount of air entering the pulmonary alveoli.
References in periodicals archive ?
The underventilation hours tend to occur in groups that are three-to-five hours in duration.
The occupant may choose not to operate the system (for example, if the fan is noisy), which could result in underventilation.
Dwellings in cold, harsher climates and new residential construction are three to four times tighter, creating a tight building envelope and the potential for underventilation (Sherman and Matson 2002).
Underventilation or overventilation can be expected at certain times of the year (Yoshino et al.
By comparing SDCV and DCV strategies, we note that the DCV strategy provides less outdoor air than required, causing underventilation in critical zones (Figure 6a).
In this case, underventilation in the critical zone could occur with the DCV strategy (see point a2 for R[v.