meaning-making

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meaning-making

The efforts made by the friends and family of a person who died unexpectedly to understand the reason for that person’s death, especially if it was a suicide.
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Understanding, therefore, seems to promise a type of completeness, of sufficiency.
To create a reliable program manager development program, an organization must first have a clear and thorough understanding of the position or positions involved.
Students developed an understanding that adapting to changing group members took time.
In some ways their hearts were more open to receiving the gifts of the Holy Spirit--wisdom, understanding, right judgment, courage, knowledge, reverence, and wonder and awe--once they were old enough to reflect on what that meant for their lives.
This unified workflow environment enables collaboration and helps the different functional roles work together with an understanding of their specific requirements in the context of a view of the bigger picture.
* perform a more exacting assessment of the risk of material misstatement resulting from such understanding; and
"My very strong view," says Schwartz, "is that environmental health science is poised to make incredibly important contributions to understanding very basic biological mechanisms that will have profound effects on human health and disease."
For example, in his analysis of Middle Passage, Storhoff defines the novel's trajectory as Rutherford Calhoun's "emotional separation from Falcon, toward a Buddhist understanding of emptiness and dependent origination" (168).
Materials should clarify that campers and their families share in the responsibility for the camper's well-being, including the determination of camper suitability for the camp experience and for understanding and managing the risks.
(1) In my first response to Stout I thanked him for forcing me to revisit some of the early and, I hope, continuing influences on me that determine my understanding of how Christians should negotiate this allegedly democratic society.
Part IV is the conclusion, providing an understanding of individuals in their context as a relational perspective of multicultural counseling and psychotherapy.
understanding must be tackled by anyone wanting to conduct a consistent