unction

(redirected from unctions)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

unction

 [ungk´shun]

unc·tion

(ŭngk'shŭn),
The action of anointing or rubbing with an ointment or oil.
[L. unctio, fr. ungo, pp. unctus, to anoint]

unction

See ointment.

unction

An obsolete term for:
(1) Ointment; 
(2) The act of applying an oil or ointment.

unc·tion

(ŭngk'shŭn)
The action of anointing or rubbing with an ointment or oil.
[L. unctio, fr. ungo, pp. unctus, to anoint]

unction

1. an ointment.
2. application of an ointment or salve; inunction.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
This delay may be the only net effect of the in, unction, because the fish may be listed as endangered even without the panel's report.
The ritual of Extreme Unction is rigorously anaphoric.
Thomas notes, take the form of simple declarations in the indicative mood (for instance, "I baptize thee"), the sacrament of the divine unction takes "the form of a petition" (Summa, Supplement, qu.
Thomas stipulates that the organs of generation--the most obvious source of erotic pleasure--are to be excluded from the anointing during the ritual of Extreme Unction "on account of their uncleanliness, and out of respect for the sacrament" (Suppl.
Forbes can administer the Extreme Unction to a dying man in front of his grieving family while privately believing the "form" is simply a shell of older customs.
25) For references to extreme unction, see Glossarum mediae et infirmae latinitatis 58.
Dante rose above the tedious, lawyerly wrangling over whether unction and benediction were, or were not, necessary, and went to the heart of the matter to ask whether they were, instead, efficacious and increased charity.
As hierocrats played down the significance of the power of unction received by the monarch as something less than ecclesiastic ordination (fearing that, by its resemblance to the consecration of bishops, it endowed spiritual power to the temporal monarch--they had changed the place of unction from the head to the arms, as is still practiced in the British ceremony, for example), royalists and imperialists came to think of coronations as a mere superfluity: "The pope is not superior in temporal affairs," opined Calvaruso; he held that the imperial election alone bestowed all power upon the Roman Prince (Memoriale 1311, 1340).
In the first example, Thomas judges that only someone in grave need of physical healing is competent to receive the sacrament of extreme unction (today, anointing of the sick), because the spiritual healing conferred by the sacrament is signified by way of bodily healing.
Just as in extreme unction it is necessary to have a sick person in order to signify the need of healing, so in orders the male sex is necessary, both for the liceity and validity of the sacrament, in order to signify eminence of degree.
The reason for this is that the sacrament is a sign and hence requires not only the reality signified (res), but also the signification of that reality (significatio rei); for example, since Extreme Unction signifies the healing of the sick, only a sick person can validly receive it.