unconscious

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unconscious

 [un-kon´shus]
1. insensible; incapable of responding to sensory stimuli and of having subjective experiences.
2. the part of the mind that is not readily accessible to conscious awareness by ordinary means but whose existence may be manifested in symptom formation, in dreams, or under the influence of drugs; it is one of the systems of Freud's topographic model of the mind.
collective unconscious in jungian psychology, the portion of the unconscious that is theoretically common to mankind.

un·con·scious

(ŭn-kon'shŭs),
1. Not conscious.
2. In psychoanalysis, the psychic structure comprising the drives and feelings of which one is unaware.
Synonym(s): insensible (1)

unconscious

/un·con·scious/ (un-kon´shus)
1. insensible; incapable of responding to sensory stimuli and of having subjective experiences.
2. the part of the mind not readily accessible to conscious awareness but whose existence may be manifested in symptom formation, in dreams, or under the influence of drugs.

collective unconscious  the elements of the unconscious that are theoretically common to mankind.

unconscious

(ŭn-kŏn′shəs)
adj.
1. Lacking awareness and the capacity for sensory perception; not conscious.
2. Temporarily lacking consciousness.
3. Occurring in the absence of conscious awareness or thought: unconscious resentment; unconscious fears.
4. Without conscious control; involuntary or unintended: an unconscious mannerism.
n.
The division of the mind in psychoanalytic theory containing elements of psychic makeup, such as memories or repressed desires, that are not subject to conscious perception or control but that often affect conscious thoughts and behavior.

un·con′scious·ly adv.
un·con′scious·ness n.

unconscious

[unkon′shəs]
Etymology: ME, un + L, conscire, to be aware
1 unaware of the surrounding environment; insensible; incapable of responding to sensory stimuli.
2 (in psychiatry) the part of the mental function in which thoughts, ideas, emotions, or memories are beyond awareness and rarely subject to ready recall. It contains data that have never been conscious or that were conscious at one time, usually for a brief period, and later repressed. Compare preconscious. See also collective unconscious, personal unconscious.

unconscious

adjective
1. Not conscious, referring to a reflex movement.
2. The psychic structure(s), per the psychoanalytic construct, of which a person is unaware Psychiatry That part of the mind or mental functioning of which the content is only rarely subject to awareness; it is a repository for data that have never been conscious–primary repression or that may have been conscious briefly and later repressed–secondary repression.

un·con·scious

(ŭn-kon'shŭs)
1. Not conscious; lacking awareness.
2. psychoanalysis The psychic structure comprising the drives and feelings of which one is unaware.
Synonym(s): insensible (1) .

unconscious

1. Pertaining to a person lacking awareness or to mental processes that proceed outside consciousness.
2. A person's total memory store, whether immediately accessible or not.
3. The domain of the psyche, characterized by Freud (see FREUDIAN THEORY) as having a content that was not accessible because it was unacceptable and thus repressed. Compare CONSCIOUS, SUBCONSCIOUS.

unconscious,

n in hypnotherapy, the unconscious is viewed as sensory information not in current awareness.

un·con·scious

(ŭn-kon'shŭs)
1. Not conscious.
2. In psychoanalysis, the psychic structure comprising the drives and feelings of which one is unaware.
Synonym(s): insensible (1) .

unconscious (unkon´shəs),

adj insensible; not receiving any sensory impression and not having any subjective experiences.

unconscious

insensible; incapable of responding to sensory stimuli and of having subjective experiences.
References in periodicals archive ?
I had convinced myself I wouldn't complete the event and so was not consciously or unconsciously on the lookout for ways to complete, eg pacing myself better, taking on regular energy supplies etc.
People noticed words in sentences that didn't make sense more quickly than in those that did, which suggest that the sentences had been unconsciously processed.
There is a danger she may try to manipulate you either intentionally or unconsciously so don't be tempted to make her feel better at your expense.
Caesar's vicar, Pontius Pilate, twice asks Jesus whether he is a king (18:33,37) and, with typical Johannine irony, unconsciously proclaims the truth to the crowd: "Here is your king
It is clear that I come with a prejudice and may unconsciously (Unconsciously
And the case for it is made, unconsciously I'm sure, by Anne Peebles of Shell Oil, who, in the course of arguing that Shell can't do anything about the problem, tells Everly, "Temperature correction is not something one company can do.
Charles has a boring job as a clerk with the East India Company and drinks too much; Mary stays at home with her senile, unconsciously witty father and her demanding mother.
It is stunning and distressing for its scenes of children sniffing glue and sleeping on the streets, attempting to unconsciously live through horrors that couldn't be imagined by those of us living on this side of the world.
In Blink he analyzes intuition--the judgments we make unconsciously and instinctively--and he explores how we can master this important aspect of successful decision-making.
But I have to admit that I find myself unconsciously knowing--and rapping aloud--pretty much all of the lyrics to Eminem's songs.
Humans are infected by unconsciously swallowing infected mites, and in Mauritius, children were infected by eating guavas that had fallen on the soil (10).
For example, if the expert unconsciously experiences an affinity for a retaining attorney who resembles a sibling, the expert may be motivated to opine in favor of the attorney's client.