Uncle

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A regional term for Federal agents of the DEA—Drug Enforcement Administration
References in classic literature ?
"Then I'll come aboard and salute," he added; and, to Rose's great amazement, Uncle Alec went up one of the pillars of the back piazza hand over hand, stepped across the roof, and swung himself into her balcony, saying, as he landed on the wide balustrade: "Have you any doubts about me now, ma'am?"
This little society now past two or three very agreeable hours together, in which the uncle, who was a very great lover of his bottle, had so well plyed his nephew, that this latter, though not drunk, began to be somewhat flustered; and now Mr Nightingale, taking the old gentleman with him upstairs into the apartment he had lately occupied, unbosomed himself as follows:--
Ogg's, to see his uncle Deane, who was to come home last night, his aunt had said; and Tom had made up his mind that his uncle Deane was the right person to ask for advice about getting some employment.
'My uncle looked at the guard for a few seconds, in some doubt whether it wouldn't be better to wrench his blunderbuss from him, fire it in the face of the man with the big sword, knock the rest of the company over the head with the stock, snatch up the young lady, and go off in the smoke.
"It's a lee, it's a black lee!" cried my uncle. "He was never kidnapped.
"Aunt Janet, Uncle Blair is here," I announced breathlessly at the kitchen door.
I could give them no positive information -- for my uncle never consulted me on matters of business.
This worried Uncle Henry a good deal, for without the farm he would have no way to earn a living.
Do you think you will be able to find my uncle for me?"
Knowing how bitterly disappointed my uncle would have been in his place, I apologized very earnestly.
"And you, Michael Nikanorovich?" he said, addressing "Uncle."
It give me the cold shudders when he said them words, because right away I remembered about us seeing Uncle Silas prowling around with a long-handled shovel away in the night that night.