uncertainty

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uncertainty

(ŭn″sĕrt′ăn-tē)
The state of being uncertain; feelings of doubt, ambiguity.

uncertainty,

n 1., principle in quantum physics; states that simultaneously knowing both the position and the momentum of a particle is impossible.
2., the state of medical decision making for many condi-tions and situations.
References in periodicals archive ?
Typical uncertainty of an EVC is [+ or -]1% and includes uncertainties of pressure measurement, temperature measurement, compressibility, and signal processing in EVC.
We developed the open-ended Career Uncertainty Questionnaire (CUQ) to explore career uncertainties perceived by college students.
f] is the standard uncertainty associated with the applied force, due to uncertainties in the mass calibration and adjustment of the dead weights and to uncertainties in the air density and the acceleration of gravity.
The uncertainties created by variations in workflow and the types of tasks required by the MPO suggest that the current form of organization is not appropriate to the demands placed on it.
The answer is that some financial statement users viewed the uncertainties explanatory paragraph as a useful red flag--a feeling based at least partly on their concerns about the adequacy of financial statement disclosure of uncertainties.
forecasts), it does require that companies disclose presently known trends, events, and uncertainties that have had or are reasonably expected to have material effects on a company's financial position and results of operations.
A common interpretation is summarized by Nielsen [3] as follows: "The purpose of measurement intercomparisons between NMIs is to test, whether measurements performed in the participating countries are consistent taking into account the uncertainties assigned to the measurements.
The uncertainty of an experiment is a result of the individual uncertainties of each part of the experiment that may add error to the result.
There was no standard solution to this problem, so NIST statisticians developed a new method for determining the uncertainty of a regression slope for data characterized by standard uncertainties.
Such statements are based on management's current expectations and are subject to certain factors, risks and uncertainties that may cause actual results, outcome of events, timing and performance to differ materially from those expressed or implied by such forward-looking statements.
The calibration of an instrument or artifact under extended validity conditions must have its errors and uncertainties assessed over this range of conditions, or alternatively, if a sufficient model describing the behavior of the artifact or instrument exists, then t he consequences of these conditions can be calculated and included in the calibration report.