ultraviolet ray


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Related to ultraviolet ray: infrared ray, Gamma rays, visible light

ultraviolet ray

An invisible ray of the spectrum beyond the violet rays. The wavelengths of ultraviolet rays vary. They may be refracted, reflected, and polarized, but will not traverse many substances impervious to the rays of the visible spectrum. They rapidly destroy the vitality of bacteria, and are able to produce photochemical and photographic effects.
See also: ray
References in periodicals archive ?
The black light lamp which produces the ultraviolet ray intensity is higher than in the sunlight by far the ultraviolet ray intensity, also the duration to the human body harmful influence to be longer.
Data show hairless mice taking the hyaluronic acid orally for 6 weeks significantly suppressed the decrease of skin moisture and resultant formation of wrinkles under ultraviolet rays. The data follow Kewpie's previously performed test showing significant skin moisture increase by oral intake of hyaluronic acid 120 mg/day for 6 weeks.
Previous research supported the notion that sunless tanning products became popular as public awareness about skin cancer increased and people decreased their amount of exposure to ultraviolet rays of the sun or tanning beds.
"The sun has ultraviolet rays A, B, and C that can be harmful to the eye." Photokeratitis is a type of "sunburn" of the eye characterized by symptoms that include redness, light sensitivity, excessive tearing, and/or a gritty feeling.
And unlike the April 16 story - which devoted whole paragraphs to commonsense points such as ultraviolet rays harming the eyes, while in reality tanners always wear goggles to prevent this, because it's the law - there's an amazing amount of evidence in favor of sunshine, tanning, and the body's most fundamentally important nutritional ally: vitamin D.
Even sitting under an umbrella is not the answer, as it still allows 40 per cent of ultraviolet rays to pass through, said Nicosia dermatologist Dr Constantinos Demetriou.
The thin film device could be worn as a wrist band to warn wearers they risk receiving a potentially harmful dose of ultraviolet rays. UV rays drive a chemical reaction in the indicator, releasing an acid into a dye, and causing it to change colour.
The earth's diminishing ozone layer, which filters out less UV light, makes humans more susceptible to ultraviolet rays.
Exposure to the sun's ultraviolet rays damages skin - that's unavoidable, and the reason why fair skin changes colour to give a tan as the pigment melanin is laid down to protect the vulnerable deeper layers.
This chemical gives skin its color and guards against the sun's ultraviolet rays.
What part of the stratosphere protects the Earth from ultraviolet rays?
Iran's Health Ministry has outlawed the use of tanning beds on health grounds and warned Iranians of the cancer hazards of exposure to ultraviolet rays.

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