ultrastructure

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ultrastructure

 [ul´trah-struk″chur]
the structure visible only under the ultramicroscope and electron microscope.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

ul·tra·struc·ture

(ŭl'tră-strŭk'chūr),
Structures or particles seen with the electron microscope.
Synonym(s): fine structure
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

ultrastructure

(ŭl′trə-strŭk′chər)
n.
The detailed structure of a biological specimen, such as a cell, tissue, or organ, that can be observed only by electron microscopy. Also called fine structure.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

ultrastructure

the fine detail of CELL structure, which requires the use of the ELECTRON MICROSCOPE for proper visualization.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Additionally, 3 trees were randomly selected from each treatment group and 3 leaves per plant were collected to measure the tissue microstructure of the leaves and the chloroplast ultrastructure of the palisade tissue.
Ultrastructure, taxonomy and affinities of some Ordovician and Silurian organic microfossils.
In S4, the mesophyll cell ultrastructures in plants under shade treatment were more intact than under sun expose treatment, and the chloroplasts had a more rounded shape than previously observed emerging with large starch grains (Fig.
For example, the cuticular ultrastructure of the seagrass Halodule wrightii was observed to be modified when in contact with the epiphytic alga Hincksia mitchelliae [5].
Pituitary ultrastructure. In the pituitaries from control rats at all time points after DEN administration, most of the granular cells were of the storage type, characterized by many secretory granules and an inactive appearance, with poor development of endoplasmic reticula (ER) and Golgi complex (Figure 1), as described in detail by others (13,37).
Using these criteria, Carter and Clark (1985) categorized structures illustrated in various studies of bryozoan ultrastructures as semi-nacreous.
The complexity of skeletal ultrastructures was presumably not related to the evolutionary replacement of Palaeozoic problematic tubeworms by calcareous polychaete tubeworms in the Middle Mesozoic.
Recent serpulids possess the diverse fabrics of complex oriented tube ultrastructures which appeared presumably already in the Cretaceous or in the Early Cenozoic at the latest (Vinn 2008; Vinn & Furrer 2008).
A pot-culture experiment was conducted to investigate growth performance, physiological and biochemical responses, and cellular ultrastructure of the Jatropha (Jatropha curcas L.) seedling exposed to cadmium (Cd), lead (Pb) and their combined stress.