ulnocarpal

ulnocarpal

 [ul″no-kahr´pal]
pertaining to the ulna and carpus.

ul·no·car·pal

(ŭl'nō-kar'păl),
Relating to the ulna and the carpus, or to the ulnar side of the wrist.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ultimately, patients will develop restriction of movement and ulnocarpal wrist pain.
The primary stabiliser of the DRUJ is the TFCC, which encompasses the dorsal and volar radio-ulnar ligaments, the central articular disc, the meniscus homolog, the extensor carpi ulnaris (ECU) subsheath, and the ulnocarpal ligaments.
It helps to maintain the stability of the ulnocarpal joint and allows the stable motion of the wrist and the rotation of the forearm.[sup][3],[4],[5],[6],[7],[8],[9],[10]
Figure 5(g) shows all anatomical planes in 1.5 T magnetic resonance imaging (top row, bottom left) and a three-dimensional reconstruction of the ulnocarpal disc region (bottom right) of the same patient.
[23] It can leads to alterations in normal anatomic and biomechanical relations of distal radius, incongruency at DRUJ and DRCJ with changes in volar tilt and ulnar variance, loss of relative length and rotational deformity, which can finally lead to change in load concentration, shift of forces to volar position, decreased ROM, ulnocarpal impingement, changing the carpal tunnel direction, angulations in the flexor tendons, decreasing the grip strength and leading to post-traumatic arthrosis and diminished function.
Segment Proximal boundary Distal boundary Upper Arm Glenohumeral Joint Humeroulnar Joint Forearm Humeroulnar Joint Ulnocarpal Joint Hand Ulnocarpal Joint Distal Phalanges Thigh Shank Femoral Head Tibiofemoral Joint Tibiofemoral Joint Talocrural Joint Foot Talocrural Joint Distal Phalanges Segment Basic description (a) Upper Arm Commences between the head of the Humerus and glenoid fossa of the Scapula, separating the upper arm from the trunk; Ending at the elbow axis, noted by the trochlea of the Humerus and olecranon process of the Ulna.
a) ulnocarpal abutment syndrome: subchondral bone marrow edema and cystic changes of the ulnar margin of the lunate, triangular fibrocartilage degeneration or tear, frequently with positive ulnar variance (Figure 5);
(1,2) Ulnar impaction syndrome, or ulnocarpal abutment, is a common degenerative condition causing ulnar-sided wrist pain.
We could not find signs of triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) injuries including the ulnar fovea sign and pain elicited by the ulnocarpal stress test.
It is important to note the difference in terminology, as the TFCC refers to the entire complex, including the volar and dorsal radio-ulnar ligaments, ulnar collateral, ulnocarpal ligaments, as well as the articular disk.
The incidence of ulnocarpal complaints after distal radial fracture in relation to the fracture of the ulnar styloid.