ulnar

(redirected from ulnar nerve injury)
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Related to ulnar nerve injury: claw hand

ulnar

 [ul´nar]
pertaining to the ulna or to the ulnar (medial) aspect of the upper limb as compared to the radial (lateral) aspect.

ul·nar

(ŭl'năr), [TA]
Relating to the ulna, or to any of the structures (for example, artery, nerve) named from it; relating to the ulnar or medial aspect of the upper limb.
Synonym(s): ulnaris [TA]

ul·nar

(ŭl'năr) [TA]
Relating to the ulna, or to any of the structures (artery, nerve) named from it; relating to the ulnar or medial aspect of the upper limb.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the clinical practice, it appeared that this method includes the possibility of iatrogenic ulnar nerve injury [23] and therefore is rarely used.
Therefore, computer use has not been considered as a potential activity related to the ulnar nerve injury at the elbow.
The current literature also recommends cross-pins for maximal stabilisation.22 As the incision is medial, it allows the ulnar nerve to be located and prevents iatrogenic ulnar nerve injury. We found that this approach yielded very good cosmetic results in all patients except 3(3.79%), and all patients were satisfied with the results.
Many studies have recommended Kirschner wire from the lateral condyle in either parallel or crossed or divergent configurations to minimize iatrogenic ulnar nerve injury. (7) Immobilization of the involved extremity after closed reduction and percutaneous pin fixation with above elbow, plaster slab immobilization with arm to chest strapping gives additional rotational stability at the fracture site and prevent redisplacement.
After nerve damage, primary suture was performed in 52 patients with median nerve trauma, 42 with ulnar nerve injury and in 3 patients with radial nerve damage.
We report a case of a 23-year old recreational cyclist who experienced severe ulnar nerve injury while cycling across Canada.
(5) studied 15 patients with both median and ulnar nerve injury associated with zone V FTI and 54% of them had good and excellent results and 20% had poor results.
Heymach's report indicated that he was a licensed physician and that after reviewing the plaintiff's medical records, he concluded that the defendant failed to acquire the plaintiff's informed consent for the intravenous administration she received, that the defendant failed to inform the plaintiff "what to expect" and the attendant risks of the procedure, and that as a result of an improper intravenous administration, the plaintiff suffered a long-term extravasational injury, ulnar nerve injury, and a weakness in her left hand.
(17.) Vastamaki M, Kallio PK, et al: The results of secondary microsurgical repair of ulnar nerve injury. J Hand Surg 18B:323-326, 1993.
A case of ulnar nerve injury which managed conservatively and recovered spontaneously and completely after six months and another of injury with radial nerve recovered only partially.
Neurological symptoms (pain, paresthesia, numbness) occur as a result of concomitant ulnar nerve injury. In the hand, the ulnar nerve runs segmentally together with the ulnar artery in the ulnar eminence created by the hamulus of the hamate bone, pisiform bone, and transverse carpal ligament, which form the anatomical Guyon's canal [7-9].
Complications such as arterial spasm, bleeding, aneurysm, loss of ulnar pulse, ulnar nerve injury or ischemic symptoms of the hand were not observed in any patient during the hospital course.