ulnar nerve


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ul·nar nerve

[TA]
arises from the medial cord of the brachial plexus conveying fibers mainly from the C8 and T1 nerves; it passes down the arm, behind the medial epicondyle of the humerus, and down the ulnar side of the anterior compartment of the forearm to the hand; it gives off muscular branches in the forearm to the flexor carpi ulnaris muscle and the ulnar portion of flexor digitorum profundus and supplies the hypothenar, interosseous, medial lumbricals, adductor pollicis, and deep head of flexor hallucis brevis, and the intrinsic muscles of the hand and the skin of the small finger and medial side of the ring finger and adjacent portions of the palm of the hand. The ulnar nerve is most vulnerable to injury where it passes subcutaneously behind the medial epicondyle of the humerus. Mild injury here produces the so-called crazy bone sensation. An ulnar nerve lesion here causes loss of flexion of metacarpophalangeal joints and of extension at the interphalangeal joints ("claw hand").
Synonym(s): nervus ulnaris [TA], cubital nerve

ul·nar nerve

(ŭl'năr nĕrv) [TA]
Arises from medial cord of brachial plexus conveying fibers mainly from C8-T1 nerves; passes down arm, behind medial epicondyle of humerus, and down ulnar side of anterior compartment of forearm to hand; gives off muscular branches in forearm to flexor carpi ulnaris muscle and ulnar portion of flexor digitorum profundus and supplies hypothenar, interosseous, medial lumbricals, adductor pollicis, and deep head of flexor pollicis brevis, and intrinsic muscles of hand and skin of small finger and medial side of ring finger and adjacent portions of the palm of the hand.
Synonym(s): nervus ulnaris [TA] , cubital nerve.

ulnar nerve

One of the main nerves of the arm that supplies some of the muscles of the forearm and all the small muscles of the hand. It also provides sensation to the skin of the third of the hand on the little finger side. It is near the surface at the back of the elbow where it is liable to be painfully struck. This is the basis for the notion of the ‘funny bone’.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ulnar nerve compression by heterotopic ossification in a head-injured patient.
Secondly, the ulnar nerve was mobilized for visualization and tunnel creation as it was with the Jobe technique.
Onomura, "Tardy ulnar nerve palsy caused by cubitus varus deformity," The Journal of Hand Surgery, vol.
In a review of the clinical, electrodiagnostic, and radiographic features of ulnar neuropathy at the elbow, Landau and Campbell (5) found that there are 3 main sites of ulnar nerve compromise at the elbow: (1) retrocondylar groove, proximal to the medial epicondyle/olecranon; (2) humcro-ulnar aponeurotic areh including cubital tunnel syndrome and as the ulnar nerve passes between the areuate ligament spanning the two heads of the FCU; and (3) flexor/pronator aponeurosis as the ulnar nerve exits from beneath the FCU.
There were no statistically significant differences for the musculocutaneous nerve, median nerve and ulnar nerve. While sensory and motor block could not be achieved in 1 patient in the G1 group, complete block could not be achieved in 9 patients from the G1 group, whereas it was achieved in all the patients from the G2 group.
In his follow-up electrophysiologic tests at three months, there was still a reduction in motor conduction velocity of the ulnar nerve at the across elbow segment (60.8 m/s vs 39.5 m/s), but no significant localization was detected in an inching study.
Five children (2%) presented a combined neurovascular injury, in 1 child ulnar nerve injury and brachial thrombosis occurred and 4 children suffered from injury anterior interosseous nerve and brachial artery lesion before fracture reposition.
(a) To calculate the normal dimensions of ulnar nerve at three levels around the elbow.
The facial nerve, the brachial plexus, and the ulnar nerve were more frequently injured than any other nerve or nerve bundle.