ulnar head

ul·nar head

[TA]
the name applied to a head of origin of a forearm muscle arising from the ulna. Terminologia Anatomica lists ulnar heads (caput ulnare ...) of the following: 1) flexor carpi ulnaris [TA] (... musculi flexoris carpi ulnaris [TA]); 2) pronator teres [TA] (... musculi pronatoris teritis [TA]); and 3) extensor carpi ulnaris [TA] (... musculi extensoris carpi ulnaris [TA]).
Synonym(s): caput ulnare [TA]

ul·nar head

(ŭl'năr hed) [TA]
The name applied to a head of origin of a forearm muscle arising from the ulna. Terminologia Anatomica lists ulnar heads (caput ulnare ...) of the following: 1) flexor carpi ulnaris [TA] (... musculi flexoris carpi ulnaris [TA]); 2) pronator teres [TA] (... musculi pronatoris teretis [TA]); and 3) extensor carpi ulnaris [TA] (... musculi extensoris carpi ulnaris [TA]).
References in periodicals archive ?
1) In seven forearms from the laterodistal part of the ulnar head of the flexor carpi ulnaris muscle the formation of an accessory fusiform belly separated by an intermuscular septum of the main belly was observed.
Its humeral head is small, and originates from the medial epicondyle; the origin of the ulnar head is extensive, and it attaches to the medial margin of the olecranon and proximal two-thirds of the posterior border of the ulna.
There are several anatomic blocks that can be encountered when attempting a reduction including impaction of the ulnar head, spasm of the pronator quadratus, and interposition of the torn triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) [3-5].
UT and UL ligaments originated from the volar side of the volar distal radioulnar ligament, while ulnocapitate ligament had a direct bony origin from the fovea of the ulnar head and located more superficial to the junction between the UL and UT ligaments.
We aimed to report the incidence and types of distal ulnar head and neck fractures associated with distal radius fractures and compare outcomes in operatively versus non-operatively treated patients.
Numerous autogenous materials have been used as interpositional materials, including temporalis myofascial flap (Golovine, 1898), fascia lata, auricular cartilage, dermis, full-thickness skin, fourth metatarsal (Bardenheur, 1909), costochondral graft (Gillies, 1920), second metatarsal (Entin et al, 1968), sterno clavicular joint, ulnar head, rib, calvarial bone, fibula, and iliac bone.
In the typical course, the ulnar artery crosses deep to the median nerve and is separated from it by the ulnar head of the pronator teres muscle.
INTRODUCTION: Ulnar artery is the larger terminal branch of brachial artery in the cubital fossa (1) It passes downwards, medially and leaves the cubital fossa deep to the ulnar head of pronator teres which separates the artery from the median nerve.
Percutaneous pin fixation was used in cases of stable retention of the ulnar head after closed reduction, while ORIF was used in patients with unstable fractures of the distal ulna.
MRI showed destruction localised around the ulnar head with oedematous changes extending up the shaft of the ulna (Figure 3).
Included in the 57 chapters are 13 chapters on the diagnosis and treatment of ulnar-sided wrist pain and instability of the distal radioulnar joint; thorough coverage of the latest advancements in ulnar head replacement; and the complications, outcome assessments, and salvage procedures for carpal ligament injuries.
The usually described anatomical pattern of the pronator teres muscle (PTM) is a two-headed muscle, with a humeral head that extends from the medial epicondyle of humerus and surroundings, and an ulnar head that originates from the coronoid process of the ulna.