ulna


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Related to ulna: styloid process of ulna, Ulta

ulna

 [ul´nah] (L.)
the inner and larger bone of the forearm, on the side opposite the thumb. It articulates with the humerus and with the head of the radius at its proximal end; with the radius and bones of the carpus at the distal end.

ul·na

, gen. and pl.

ul·nae

(ŭl'nă, ŭl'nē), [TA]
The medial and larger of the two bones of the forearm.
Synonym(s): cubitus (2)
[L. elbow, arm, fr. G. ōlenē]

ulna

(ŭl′nə)
n. pl. ul·nas or ul·nae (-nē)
1. The bone extending from the elbow to the wrist on the side opposite to the thumb in humans.
2. A corresponding bone in the forelimb of other vertebrates.

ul′nar adj.

ul·na

pl. ulnae (ŭl'nă, -nē) [TA]
The medial and larger of the two bones of the forearm.
Synonym(s): cubitus (2) [TA] .
[L. elbow, arm, fr. G. ōlenē]

ulna

One of the pair of forearm long bones. The ulna is on the little finger side. At its upper end it has a hook-like process, the olecranon, that fits into a hollow at the back of the lower end of the upper arm bone (the humerus) and prevents the elbow from over-extending. When the hand is turned on the long axis of the arm, the radius bone rotates around the ulna.

ulna

the posterior of the two bones of the forearm of TETRAPODS which articulates proximally with the HUMERUS and distally with the CARPALS. see PENTADACTYL LIMB.

ul·na

(ŭl'nă, -nē) [TA]
The medial and larger of the two bones of the forearm.
Synonym(s): cubitus (2) [TA] .
[L. elbow, arm, fr. G. ōlenē]
References in periodicals archive ?
Use of length of ulna for estimation stature in living adult male in Burdwan district and adjacent areas of West Bengal.
Considering our aims to compare the mandibular bone with the ulna and calvaria the amino acids composition of the mandible was relatively different from the ulna and calvaria and that difference can be taken into consideration but in order to improve our understanding regarding the more precise differences in amino acids between these bones more sensitive techniques are needed in which we can separate collagenous part from the non-collagenous part that may give some additional important clues about the differences between these bones.
Membrane's fibers run in an oblique line form distal ulna to proximal Radius and accounts for about 70% of forearm bones stability.
Material: SDNHM 50664, right distal humerus; 51595, fragmentary left humerus; 50660, left humerus; 50686 right humerus; 51600 left ulna; 50667, proximal right ulna; 50674, distal right ulna; 51608, left carpometacarpus; 51606, left coracoid; 51611, left scapula; 50666 distal left tarsometatarsus; 50669, synsacrum; 50680, claw; 51623, 3 phalanges
The resulting radiograph separates the radius and ulna, displaying the radial head without superimposition.
In the case of the accidentally comminuted ulna, all brittle fragments were immediately removed and a small coral pin (24 mm length, 4 mm diameter) was first passed distally and then retrogradely until resistance was met at the proximal side of the ulna.
[5] In our case also, there was greenstick fracture of the distal end of ulna on right side.
showed that both a TFCC tear and a rupture of the proximal IOM were necessary to produce a dorsal dislocation of the radius relative to the ulna (more commonly referred to as a volar DRUJ injury) [12].
Lot 1 reusable set options for Radial Head Replacement, Coronoid Plating, Dorsal Buttress Plate, Radial Styloid Plate, Volar Distal Radius Plate, Volar Distal Ulna Plate, including Headless Compression Screws (additional implants) and instrumentation.
Background: Fracture of the metaphyseal region of the distal ulna is an uncommon injury that has been reported to occur concomitantly with distal radius fracture.
There are few scientific studies on the anatomy of the Saguinus leucopus (Stevenson et al., 2010), although recently the elements of the gross anatomy of the radius and humerus in relation to the function of their bone prominences for muscles and ligaments fixation and for articulation with adjacent bones (Duque-Parra et al., 2014; Duque-Parra & Velez-Garcia, 2014) like the ulna have been described.
It addresses various surgical approaches used in wrist surgery, then provides cases of fractures of the carpals, ulna, and radius, and reconstructions and treatment of complications.