ulcerative stomatitis


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Related to ulcerative stomatitis: recurrent ulcerative stomatitis

aph·tha

, pl.

aph·thae

(af'thă, af'thē), Avoid the misspelling/mispronunciation aptha.
1. In the singular, a small ulcer on a mucous membrane.
2. In the plural, stomatitis characterized by intermittent episodes of painful oral ulcers of unknown etiology that are covered by gray exudate, are surrounded by an erythematous halo, and range from several millimeters to 2 cm in diameter; they are limited to oral mucous membranes that are not bound to periosteum, occur as solitary or multiple lesions, and heal spontaneously in 1-2 weeks. Synonym(s): aphthae minor, aphthous stomatitis, canker sores, recurrent aphthous stomatitis, recurrent aphthous ulcers, recurrent ulcerative stomatitis, ulcerative stomatitis
[G. ulceration]

ulcerative stomatitis

Etymology: L, ulcus + Gk, stoma, mouth, itis, inflammation
an infectious disease of the mouth characterized by swollen spongy gums, ulcers, and loose teeth. Also called trench mouth, ulceromembranous stomatitis, Vincent's angina.

ulcerative stomatitis

1. Mouth ulcer, s, see there.
2. Herpetic stomatitis, see there.

aph·tha

, pl. aphthae (af'thă, -thē)
1. In the singular, a small ulcer on a mucous membrane.
2. In the plural, stomatitis characterized by episodes of painful oral ulcers of unknown etiology that are covered by gray exudate, are surrounded by an erythematous halo, and that heal spontaneously in 1-2 weeks.
Synonym(s): aphthae minor, aphthous stomatitis, canker sores, recurrent aphthous ulcers, recurrent ulcerative stomatitis, ulcerative stomatitis.
[G. ulceration]

stomatitis

(sto-ma-tit'is) [ stomato- + -itis]
Enlarge picture
STOMATITIS: As caused by herpes simplex virus
Inflammation of the mouth (including the lips, tongue, and mucous membranes). See: illustration; noma; thrush

Etiology

Stomatitis may be associated with viral infections, chemical irritation, radiation therapy, mouth breathing, paralysis of nerves supplying the oral area, chemotherapy that damages or destroys the mucous membranes, adverse reactions to other medicines, or acute sun damage to the lips. The nasal and oral mucosa are esp. vulnerable to trauma from dental appliances, nasal cannula, nasotracheal tubes, or catheters administering nutrients. These areas may also be damaged during surgery when an endotracheal tube is in place.

Symptoms

Symptoms include oral pain, esp. when eating or drinking, bad breath, or difficulty in swallowing. Findings include oral ulcers, friability of the mucous membranes, swollen cervical lymph nodes, and sometimes fever.

Patient care

Treatment depends on the cause but is often symptomatic. The mucous membranes should be kept moist and clear of tenacious secretions. Care of the teeth and gingival tissues should be comprehensive and include flossing. The pain of stomatitis may be alleviated by systemic analgesics or application of anesthetic preparations to painful lesions. It is important for patients with dentures to clean their dentures thoroughly. Dentures should be removed from unconscious or stuporous patient. See: toothbrushing

aphthous stomatitis

Aphthous ulcer.

corrosive stomatitis

Stomatitis resulting from intentional or accidental exposure to corrosive substances.

denture stomatitis

Stomatitis on the oral mucosa covered by full or partial dentures, most commonly seen on the palate although the inflammation may also be seen overlying the mandible.

Patient care

Although most patients are asymptomatic (the finding is noticed by dental professionals during oral examination, rather than by the patient), the condition should be treated to prevent progression to more serious oral diseases. Removal of plaque from dentures (as by brushing them carefully), removal of dentures at night, and sanitizing dentures regularly (as with an overnight soak in a chlorhexidine solution) all prevent the condition from occurring. Antifungal medications are used if fungi are isolated on culture swabs.

Synonym: chronic atrophic candidiasis

diphtheritic stomatitis

Stomatitis caused by infection with Corynebacterium diphtheriae.
See: diphtheria

herpetic stomatitis

Stomatitis seen with primary infection with herpes simplex virus.

major aphthous stomatitis

Stomatitis in which large recurring or migrating painful ulcers appear within the oral cavity (on the gingiva and soft palate) and sometimes on the lips.

membranous stomatitis

Stomatitis accompanied by the formation of a false or adventitious membrane.

mercurial stomatitis

Stomatitiss seen in those exposed to elemental mercury or mercury vapors.

mycotic stomatitis

Thrush.

nicotine stomatitis

, stomatitis nicotina
Fissuring and the formation of hyperkeratotic papules on the palate, usually caused by habitual pipe smoking. It is a form of precancer.

simple stomatitis

Stomatitis occurring in patches on the mucous membranes.

traumatic stomatitis

Stomatitis resulting from mechanical injury as from ill-fitting dentures, sharp jagged teeth, or biting the cheek.

ulcerative stomatitis

Necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis.

vesicular stomatitis

Aphthous ulcer.

Vincent stomatitis

Necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis.

aph·tha

, pl. aphthae (af'thă, -thē) Avoid the misspelling/mispronunciation aptha.
1. In the singular, a small ulcer on a mucous membrane.
2. In the plural, stomatitis characterized by intermittent episodes of painful oral ulcers of unknown etiology that are covered by gray exudate, are surrounded by an erythematous halo, and range from several millimeters to 2 cm in diameter; they are limited to oral mucous membranes that are not bound to periosteum, occur as solitary or multiple lesions, and heal spontaneously in 1-2 weeks.
Synonym(s): aphthae minor, aphthous stomatitis, canker sores, recurrent aphthous stomatitis, recurrent aphthous ulcers, recurrent ulcerative stomatitis, ulcerative stomatitis.
[G. ulceration]

ulcerative

pertaining to or characterized by ulceration.

ulcerative balanitis
see enzootic balanoposthitis.
ulcerative cellulitis
see ulcerative lymphangitis.
ulcerative colitis
see eosinophilic ulcerative colitis, histiocytic ulcerative colitis.
ulcerative dermal necrosis
a skin disease of the head of Atlantic salmon and sea trout as they enter fresh water from the sea. The cause is unknown.
ulcerative dermatitis
disease of Belgian Landrace sows; lesions occur on the ear margins, anterior aspects of the limbs and around the teats; the cause is unknown.
ulcerative dermatosis
an infectious ulceration of the skin of the lips, feet, legs and external genitalia of sheep, of uncertain etiology, caused possibly by a paravaccinia virus. The lesions are ulcerative and destructive but the disease is not fatal and the morbidity rate is not high.
ulcerative enteritis
see ulcerative enteritis.
ulcerative gingivitis
see necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis.
ulcerative glossitis, stomatitis
in cats, a proliferative inflammation and ulceration of the oral cavity, particularly gum margins and mucosa at the fauces, a common disease of old cats characterized by painful ulcers at the fauces and surrounding tissues including the tongue. The cause is not known.
ulcerative granuloma of swine
an infectious disease of pigs caused by Borrelia suilla (unofficial nomenclature), and manifested by large, deep, ulcerative lesions on any part of the body. On the face they may cause destruction of the cheeks. The portal of infection is skin wounds and spread of the disease is enhanced by fighting in the group. Called also necrotic ulcer.
infectious bovine ulcerative stomatitis
an innocuous stomatitis of calves occurring in outbreak form but recorded rarely and not in recent years. Its existence separate from bovine virus diarrhea is not proven.
ulcerative keratitis
see corneal ulcer.
ulcerative lymphangitis
see ulcerative lymphangitis.
ulcerative mammilitis
see bovine herpes mammillitis.
ulcerative pododermatosis
see ulcerative pododermatitis.
ulcerative posthitis
occurs sporadically in rams and bulls and as part of ulcerative dermatosis in rams.
ulcerative shell disease
ulcerative stomatitis
1. several virus infections cause oral ulcers in calves without any other clinical illness unless the calves are stressed, especially with hyperkeratosis caused by secondary nutritional deficiency of vitamin A.
2. outbreaks in horses are caused by grass with bristly seedheads and pasture infested with bristly caterpillars.
ulcerative typhlocolitis
one of the causes of idiopathic chronic diarrhea in horses; salmonellosis and intoxication with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are possible culprits.
ulcerative vulvitis
of ewes, see ulcerative dermatosis (above).