perforation

(redirected from ulcer perforation)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

perforation

 [per″fo-ra´shun]
a hole or break in the containing walls or membranes of an organ or structure of the body. Perforation occurs when erosion, infection, or other factors create a weak spot in the organ and internal pressure causes a rupture. It also may result from a deep penetrating wound caused by trauma.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

per·fo·ra·tion

(per'fō-rā'shŭn),
Abnormal opening in a hollow organ or viscus.
Synonym(s): tresis
[see perforated]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

perforation

Medtalk An abnormal transmural defect in a hollow organ. See Intestinal perforation.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

per·fo·ra·tion

(pĕr'fŏr-ā'shŭn)
Abnormal opening in a hollow organ or viscus.
See also: perforated
Synonym(s): tresis.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

perforation

A hole through the full thickness of the wall of an organ or tissue made by disease, injury or deliberate surgical act.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

Perforation

A hole.
Mentioned in: Otitis Media, Peritonitis
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

per·fo·ra·tion

(pĕr'fŏr-ā'shŭn)
Abnormal opening in a hollow organ or viscus.
Synonym(s): tresis.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
At the time of surgery 3 (6.3%) patients had gastric ulcer perforation, 4 (8.5%) patients had prepyloric perforation and the rest 40 (85.1%) had duodenal ulcer perforation.
(30) In Peptic Ulcer Perforation Score (PULP) and Jabalpur scoring systems, high level of serum creatinine was used in predicting risk for mortality.
To study the prevalence of duodenal ulcer perforation with respect to age.
AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: This study is aimed at comparing the efficacy of these two commonly used omental patching and omental plugging techniques in the management of duodenal ulcer perforations and also about the patient response based on duration of patient presentation.
We find that peptic ulcer perforation is predominantly a male affliction as males outnumbered females by a ratio of 3.5 to 1.
Duodenal ulcer perforation was not the most common cause of perforation peritonitis in our study as reported by Gupta et al1 and Afridi et al20 .
Data from this study indicate that laparoscopic surgical treatment of patients with peptic ulcer perforation can be implemented and completed safely in large proportion of patients with this life-threatening condition, given that the responsible surgical team has appropriate technical expertise.
Peptic ulcer bleeding and perforation are common medical emergencies, with an in-hospital or 30-day mortality of 10% for bleeding ulcers and up to 25-40% for ulcer perforation.4 Although perforated peptic ulcer frequently is considered a rather benign condition, but it is a life-threatening complication and is associated with an over-all mortality rate that still ranges between 10 and 15 per cent.5
The differential diagnosis included typhoid perforation (endemic area, signs pronounced in the hypogastrium with the ileum being the common site for typhoid perforation) and peptic ulcer perforation (self-medication with possible ulcerogenic products and absence of fever indicating chemical peritonitis).
KEY WORDS: Gastrointestinal perforation, peptic ulcer perforation, peritonitis, sudden deaths, silent perforations in sudden death, autopsy.
No patient in either group developed a symptomatic ulcer, an ulcer bleed, or ulcer perforation at any time during a full 12-month follow-up.