ubiquinone


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coenzyme

 [ko-en´zīm]
an organic molecule, usually containing phosphorus and some vitamins, sometimes separable from the enzyme protein; a coenzyme and an apoenzyme must unite in order to function (as a holoenzyme).
coenzyme A a coenzyme essential for carbohydrate and fat metabolism; among its constituents are pantothenic acid and a terminal SH group, which forms linkages with various acids, e.g., acetic acid (acetyl CoA) and fatty acids (acyl CoA); abbreviated CoA.
coenzyme Q any of a group of related quinones occurring in the lipid fraction of mitochondria and serving, along with the cytochromes, as an intermediate in electron transport; they are similar in structure and function to vitamin K1.

u·bi·qui·none

(ū'bi-kwī'nōn, ū-bik'wi-nōn),
A 2,3-dimethoxy-5-methyl-1,4-benzoquinone with a multiprenyl side chain; a mobile component of electron transport.
See also: coenzyme Q.

ubiquinone

(yo͞o′bĭ-kwĭ-nōn′, -kwĭn′ōn′)
n.
A quinone compound that serves as an electron carrier between flavoproteins and in cellular respiration.

coenzyme Q10

A factor present in mitochondria which extracts energy from foods. It has acquired a reputation among fringe nutritionists as being effective in detoxifying patients with an overdose of environmental pollutants; it is also claimed to be beneficial in treating hypertension, obesity, periodontal disease, preventing cancer, increasing longevity and revitalising the immune system.

u·bi·qui·none

(yū'bi-kwi'nōn)
A 2,3-dimethoxy-5-methyl-1,4-benzoquinone with a multiprenyl side chain; a mobile component of electron transport.
See also: coenzyme Q

ubiquinone

or

coenzyme Q

a type of QUINONE that can be reversibly reduced. It functions as an electron carrier in ELECTRON TRANSPORT SYSTEMS.
References in periodicals archive ?
As more than 90% of CAD genes are associated with ubiquinone and other terpenoid quinone biosyntheses and glycosphingolipid biosyntheses-ganglioseries, we selected genes from both metabolic pathways for further analysis.
Yamamoto, "Simultaneous detection of ubiquinol and ubiquinone in human plasma as a marker of oxidative stress," Analytical Biochemistry, vol.
In mammals, AOX prevents an over-reduction of ubiquinone, and a consequent overproduction of superoxide (El-Khoury et al.
Klein, "The design and synthesis of novel inhibitors of NADH: ubiquinone oxidoreductase," Bioorganic and Medicinal Chemistry Letters, vol.
This dog was entered into our G6PD inhibition protocol in October of 2015 and was treated daily with 60 mg/kg/day DHEA and 0.1 mg/kg/day ubiquinone. During treatment, an acute inflammatory reaction involving the eyes was noted (Figure 1).
The second cytochrome b heme ([b.sub.H]) located closer to the matrix side of the membrane accepts one electron from the first heme and reduces ubiquinone to form ubisemiquinone and, subsequently, with the passage of another to form ubiquinol [27].
Decreases in serum ubiquinone concentrations do not result in reduced levels in muscle tissue during short-term simvastatin treatment in humans.
Mevalonate is a component in the biosynthetic pathway that is shared by cholesterol, ubiquinone also known as coenzyme Q.
Since it has a quinone structure, it is also called as Ubiquinone (Hathcock and Shao, 2006).
Coenzyme Q10, also known as ubiquinone or shortened to CoQ10, is a coenzyme--a molecule that helps enzymes do their jobs--that exists naturally in humans.
Statin drugs lower cholesterol levels by blocking the mevalonate pathway, which is common to the synthesis not only of cholesterol but also ubiquinone (coenzyme Q10 or CoQ10), dolichols, selenoproteins, and several other biochemicals of extreme importance to cellular activity.