tyrothricin


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tyrothricin

 [ti″ro-thri´sin]
an antibiotic isolated from the soil bacillus Bacillus brevis, consisting principally of two polypeptides, of which the major one is tyrocidine and the other is gramicidin. It is effective against many gram-positive bacteria, and is applied topically in pyodermic, ocular, and other localized infections.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

ty·ro·thri·cin

(tī'rō-thrī'sin),
An antibacterial mixture obtained from peptone cultures of Bacillus brevis; bactericidal and bacteriostatic, and active against gram-positive bacteria. It yields the crystalline antibacterial agents gramicidin and tyrocidin; the gramicidin component is a polypeptide containing l-tryptophan, d-leucine, d-valine, l-valine, l-alanine, glycine, and an aminoethanol; the tyrocidin component is a cyclopolypeptide containing tyrosine, ornithine, and several other amino acids.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

tyrothricin

(tī′rō-thrī′sĭn)
n.
A gray-brown mixture consisting mainly of tryocidine and gramicidin, used as a topical antibiotic in treating infections caused by gram-positive bacteria.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

tyrothricin

An antibiotic obtained from the soil bacterium Bacillus brevis and used by local application to treat GRAM POSITIVE infections and mouth and throat infections. It is too toxic for systemic use. It is formulated with BENZOCAINE as lozenges under the brand name Tyrozets.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005