typology

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typology

 [ti-pol´ah-je]
the study of types; the science of classifying, as bacteria, according to type.

typology

/ty·pol·o·gy/ (ti-pol´ah-je) the study of types; the science of classifying, as bacteria according to type.

typology

the study of types; the science of classifying, as bacteria according to type.
References in periodicals archive ?
A challenge for typologists is to make their work accessible and interesting to the reader unversed in Mordvin, Aari, or Nivkh, for whom the sheer range of unfamiliar languages may seem simply bewildering.
Both typologists and populationists seek to transcend the blooming buzzing confusion of individual variation.
Most typologists and linguists in the generative tradition pick out 'give' as a typical instance of a three-place verb.
Artefact typologists might assume that the types defined ancient mental templates, or use arbitrary categories like size, but there are multiple ways of defining types, each for particular analytical purposes (Adams and Adams 1991).
For scholars and students of language, particularly typologists, historical linguists, and theorists.
Would-be comparativists and typologists will have an easier time of it, now that it exists.
It appears that compound verbs in English constitute a well-developed lexical class and require the attention of word-formationists, typologists and the linguistic community at large.
eu), which will certainly spark future collaborations between typologists and computational linguists.
The scales of difference observed within languages and language families are phenomena for historical linguists and variationists, rather than Optimality Theory typologists, to explain.
It would be great if typologists could draw on comprehensive accounts of this type, but as large electronic corpora do not (yet) exist for many of the world's languages, typologists have to resort, as they do, to the descriptions available, which often are very limited in scope and outdated, if not inaccurate.
This is true for many of the conceptual spaces that semantic map typologists have worked on in relation to case, aspect, tense, modality, and evidentiality.