typology

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typology

 [ti-pol´ah-je]
the study of types; the science of classifying, as bacteria, according to type.

typology

/ty·pol·o·gy/ (ti-pol´ah-je) the study of types; the science of classifying, as bacteria according to type.

typology

the study of types; the science of classifying, as bacteria according to type.
References in periodicals archive ?
Strategic typologies are the frameworks that identify multiple competitive strategies available to business units.
For young research fields, as is the case of internationalization in higher education, typologies have proven to be invaluable tools for dealing with epistemological problems (Arts and Gelissen, 2002).
The classification prepared by Ingfocol in 2010 was used as validation reference for the classification process of the 6 typologies of variables tested with Kohonen method.
The typologies above have some influence in how the world is perceived.
The intrinsic reasons why the typologies engage in social networking are also different.
Secondly, recent pottery studies have resulted in typologies that make it possible to date the strata of a number of archaeological excavations in Egypt and the Levant precisely, thus giving an indication of the sequence of scarab series originating from the same sites.
A number of researchers have developed typologies that attempt to identify the salient features that distinguish subsidiaries (e.
Although these typologies are not mutually exclusive, Grignon uses them to understand the situations when people dine together.
He also discusses problems with earlier evolutionist models, which have tended to focus on surface resemblance -- primarily visual likeness -- to construct typologies.
Linz acknowledges the principal difficulties that his typologies have encountered in the past quarter century.
While focusing on what accounts for the "degree" or "density" of ritual in certain societies, Bell expounds upon the typologies of Weber, Bellah, and Douglas, ultimately recasting the latter's into her own four societal "styles" of ritual action: (1) "appeasement and appeal," (2) "cosmic ordering," (3) "moral redemption," and (4) "personal spirituality" (185-90).
This study examines individual differences in risk perception typologies, specifically for recombinant bovine growth hormone (rbGH).