typological thinking

typological thinking

a CLASSIFICATION concept that disregards individual variation and considers all members of a population to be replicas of the TYPE.
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Logical, causal thinking functions in one "tense" whereas typological thinking assumes a future, and can even transcend time itself.
As Wieseltier said in an interview yesterday, "The problem with typological thinking about history is that it is the opposite of the kind of thinking that is needed for threat assessment, which has to be a solely empirical activity.
Lewalski (1979) provides an analysis of Protestant typological thinking in sixteenth-century literature, and Bercovich illustrates the influence of typological thinking on American conceptions of nation and self from the sixteenth to the nineteenth century.
He also cites Augustine's important contribution to typological thinking in the West, arguing that in his works typological patterns "become much more than merely analogical: they reveal God's redemptive purpose.
Elucidating this thesis with reference to such Victorian theorists of poetry as John Keble, John Henry Newman, Eneas Dallas, Matthew Arnold, and Stopford Brooke, Scheinberg argues that, on the one hand, the reliance upon typological thinking in Victorian aesthetics and theology (familiar to us from the work of George P.
She raises significant questions concerning the scale of analysis (collating and analysing individuals of diverse geographical or temporal associations), and problems with typological thinking that sometimes underlies terms like "Melanesian," "Micronesian," and "Polynesian.
The problem with the typological subspecies concept, and with typological thinking in biology, is that evolutionary theory no longer uses a natural-state model to understand biological diversity (Sober [1980]).
This all comes from typological thinking (Mayr 1962, 1963).